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The James Garbani & Other Consignors
Arizona Mining Stock & Document Collection
Auction Date: Saturday, March 23, 2002
Absentee Bids Due: Friday, March 22, 6 pm PST

ARIZONA - Santa Cruz

SANTA CRUZ

1120. Santa Cruz. Aztec. Iturbide Gold Dredging Corp. Inc. in DC, 1904. Certificate no. 13 issued to F.W. Gage for 25 shares in 1904. Signed by John R. Roslyn, President and Chas. H. Robinson, Secretary. Black border with gold safety print, seal, and “shares $100 each” in underprint, vignette of U.S. capitol in upper center, vignettes of U.S. shield in four corners in border, uncancelled, 8 x 10 excellent condition with slight fold creases. No references found. Location reported by Garbani as the Aztec district. The name Iturbide most likely was taken from Don Agustin de Iturbide, the Emperor of Mexico in the early 19th century. Agustin was born in 1783 and was educated at the college of St Nicholas and the officer’s academy. He was commissioned 2nd Lieutenant and worked his way up through the military and political ranks, attaining the rank of commander of the Army of the Three Guarantees. He was sympathetic to the independence movement and subsequent to Mexico’s independence in September of 1821 he was urged to assume the throne, but he initially declined. However, in July of 1822, the coronation of Don Agustin as Emperor of Mexico took place in Mexico City. He was popular among the people, but had many detractors in higher positions and eventually was pressured to leave the throne. He offered to abdicate and stepped down in March of 1823. After his abdication, he moved to Italy and later to England. His departure had no effect on the worsening situation in Mexico and word reached him that the masses and the army were still behind him, viewing him as the only one capable of bringing peace and stability to the newly independent Mexico. He returned by ship in May 1824, but was met by agents of the politicians in power in Mexico City who ordered that he be executed without trial for having returned to Mexico without permission. He was placed before a firing squad of militia and promptly executed. Being somewhat of a folk hero among the masses, Iturbide may have been a name commonly used to elicit a favorable image. (Ref: Internet source on the Iturbide family. 4 pp. included with certificate.) Est. $25-50

1121. Santa Cruz. Crittenden. Crittenden Land and Cattle Company. Incorporated in Arizona Territory in 1887. Certificate number 1 issued to R. R. Richardson for 1000 shares in 1886 (note the date of the issue is less than the incorporation date). Signed by president R. R. Richardson and secretary L. H. Gormley. No printer. No vignette. Under print of a brown bulls head in the center. Uncancelled. Folds. Very fancy green border and highlighting with green print of vanilla paper. Size 5 1/2 X 10” Founder’s Share. The Journal of Arizona History (p. 47) sites that R. R. Richardson (Rollin Rice Richardson) was born at Shippenville, Clarion County, Pennsylvania on July 10, 1846. In June of 1864, he enrolled for “100 days” in Captain Turner’s Independent Company of volunteer infantry. He did not face combat. Returning to work in the family’s mercantile business, he caught the oil fever. He invested in twenty-one wells before he finally came up with a producer. From this humble start in about 1869, he worked full-time at the oil business. He became interested in more than 200 producing wells, and two of the first three pipe lines for carrying oil. He was a crafty individual and came to south-central Arizona in 1880 from Pennsylvania at the age of thirty three. He bought 160 acres of land in 1881 and secured a use option of a Spanish/Mexican land grant. He sold this investment in 1883. He then bought the Monkey Springs Ranch along with four adjacent parcels. He then bought the old Camp Crittenden Military Reservation. He called the combined properties the Pennsylvania Ranch. He also secured every watering place near these holdings, with scrip (rights to specified plots of federal land) and mining claims totaling 144,000 acres. L. H. Gormley (the secretary of the Crittenden L&CC) was the first partner that Richardson brought in to work the ranch. He next brought in Alex Harrison. Both men received equal shares as incentive for their future services. In 1887 Richardson went to visit Geronimo, the Apache leader imprisoned in Pensacola. According too the Richardson family, Richardson had given Geronimo and the Apaches enough cattle to live on and in return, Geronimo agreed not to pillage the ranch. The agreement lasted until Geronimo’s surrender in 1886. In 1888 he bought the Ashburn homestead for his Crittenden Land and Cattle Company. Richardson located, traded or bought many mines and was particularly interested in copper strikes near Harshaw Creek. Eventually, his partners got “cold feet.” &#x201I gave (Harrison $3,000 for his share and Gormley, who was heavily in debt to me, turned over all he had and gave me notes for $60,000,” Richardson reported. &#x201Coth men left the country”. Richardson served as the Pima County supervisor in 1898 and when Santa Cruz County was carved form Pima county in 1899, Richardson was appointed to the first board of supervisors of the new county. He was replaced however after he failed to attend the first board meeting. Ex Rare. Est. $300-500

1122. Santa Cruz. General. Mining Company Letters. Lot of four items. (1) Hhandwritten letter from World’s Fair Mines, Harshaw to Chas Willis, 1916, (2) Map, no scale of Harshaw district, 8 x 11, (3) Big Reef Copper Company, Mayer Arizona, monthly receipts., 1918, (4) Carmelita Mining and Milling Company, Wenden, Arizona, Report of receipts and disbursements 1918. Est.$25-75

1123. Santa Cruz. General. Prudential Mining Co. Incorporated in Arizona. No date. Certificate no. 302 issued to G. E. Burkner for 500 shares in 1909. Signed by E.F. Attemose, vice-President, and G.E. Stone, Secretary. Black border with green safety print and seal, small vignettes of miner in corner borders, vignette of underground miners top center, uncancelled, 8 x 11, VF condition with folds, 1 inch or less tears at folds. No references found, Garbani places company in Santa Cruz county. Est. $25-75

1124. Santa Cruz. Greaterville. Onyx King Quarries Co. Proposition (In a Nutshell). Some of the same officers as the Onyx King MC, no doubt affiliated with this company (which see). Said worth of $2500 per average carload, claiming it only be necessary to sell 10 carloads per year. Yet they could not estimate average cost for mining. Promising a monopoly effect to prospective investors, Onyx King claims 90% of onyx import. Vf, folds. Est. $75-150

1125. Santa Cruz. Harshaw. Alta Mining and Smelting Company of Arizona. Incorporated in New York. Certificate number 66 issued to William Schley for 100 shares in 1880. Signed by President Wm. Schley and Secretary R. B. Minor. Printed by Beadle & Brown, NY. Vignette top center of several miners working underground. Uncancelled. Folds. &#x201Location of mines, Pima County, Arizona Territory.” Datelined New York. Black border and print on white paper. 8 x 10. This mine was located near the Hardshell Mine in Pima County, now in Santa Cruz County. It was developed first in the late 1870’s and early 1880’s and a little high-grade silver-lead ore was shipped to the Benson and Charleston smelters (Tenney, p. 312). Burchard (1881, p. 302) reports the mine was opened by several shafts showing an extensive ore body, although it had been idle for some time. He noted it was owned by eastern parties who intended to, “…commence work upon it at an early day.” Est. $200-500

1126. Santa Cruz. Harshaw. American Mineral Co. Incorporated in Arizona in 1911. Certificate no. 19 issued to A. P. Cranston for 200 shares in 1911. Signed by President Alex R. Baker and Treasurer John Hall Jones. Brown border with brown safety inner border, brown underprint “shares $1.00 each”, vignette of bald eagle perched on mountain at top center, uncancelled, 8 x 12, VF condition with slight folds, one set minor staple holes upper left edge. We could find no references for the company. Garbani places the company at the Harshaw district. Est.$25-50

1127. Santa Cruz. Harshaw. Fortuna Consol. MC. Cert. #20514. Incorporated in Arizona in 1917. Issued to Theo. J. Beck for 1000 shares in 1929. Signed by President Nash Rockwood and Secretary Frank Sullivan. Uncancelled. In and out of financial difficulties, and becoming mixed up with scammers such as Geo. G. Rice, in 1931 the company, supposedly back on its feet, leased property in order to satisfy debt. Weed, however, doubted the claims 21 claims were legit, nor that the company’s affiliation with “Iconoclast” Rice would prove helpful (Ref: Weed, 1924, p.308-09; 1926, p.259; Rand, 1931, pp.314-315). No vignette. Black border. No printer noted. Vf, folds and minor chips to edges. 9” x 11”. Est. $25-50

1128. Santa Cruz. Harshaw. Prietas Commercial Co. Incorporated in Arizona in 1905. Certificate no. 537 issued to A.H. Marsh for 1,000 shares in 1908. Signed by W.B. Duvall, President, and Chas. D. Ricker, Treasurer. Black border with gold safety print, vignette of large steamship and railroad locomotive with cars at top center, uncancelled, 8 x 10, VF condition with folds, one staple holes in upper left. We have no definite link of this company with the Harshaw district, however, the Hardsell Mine, located there in 1877, was operated by the Hermosa Mining Company that later was renamed the Prietus (sic) Mines Co, according to Schrader (1915, p. 272). This company was a Sonoran company and operated the mine from October 1880 to November 1881, and amalgamated a million dollars worth of silver chloride ore on site. This company sold the mine in 1887, however the name may have been adapted by the Prietas Commercial Co. in 1905. Est.$25-50

1129. Santa Cruz. Harshaw. Red Mountain Copper Co. Incorporated in Arizona 1913. Issued to Lewis M Kuzin for 3423 shares, cert #305, in 1916. Signed by J. W. Walker vice president and W. T. Smith secretary. Vignette at upper left of a seated woman holding up a wreath. Orange border, seal and safety print. Uncancelled. Printer - Goes. 8 x 11. This company is not referenced within our library. There are several mining companies in Arizona and the west that used Red Mountain in their titles. There are also several Red Mountains in three different counties in Arizona. We have placed it in our best guess, the Harshaw district just south of Patagonia. This was a copper district with a mountain by that name centrally located. This mountain consists primarily of rhyolite impregnated with pyrite, chalcopyrite, and chalcocite. The oxidation of the iron in these minerals has colored the entire mountain a brilliant red (Schrader, 1915, p. 245-247) Two hole punches at left edge. Very fine. Est. $25-50

1130. Santa Cruz. Harshaw. Santo Nino Mines Corp. Incorporated in Arizona in 1928. Certificate no. 437 issued to J.E. Bowser for 1,499 shares in 1929. Signed by A.E. Gibson, President, and Edw. F. Dolan, Secretary. Brown border, vignette of liberty torch upper center, uncancelled, 8 x 10, Extremely fine condition with minor folds. The company had 5 claims in the Harshaw district 5 miles southeast of Patagonia. The property covered the projected extension of the Josephine orebody which consists of a 1 to 5 foot fissure vein in diorite with lead and silver ores. The company also had 2 claims in the Oatman district, Mojave county which did not prove a success. [Ref: 1931CH, p. 410]. Est. $25-50

1131. Santa Cruz. Nogales. Arizona Girl Mining and Milling Company. Incorporated in Arizona. No date. Certificate no. 138 Unissued. Unsigned. Black border with gold safety print, vignettes of underground miner in border corners, left and right centers, vignette of underground mining scene upper left, 8 x 11, Mint condition. Welty and others (1985, Mine Index for Metallic Mineral Districts of Arizona, p 67) report an Arizona Girl mine located in the Nogales mining district, but provide no other data. Est. $10-25

1132. Santa Cruz. Nogales. Austerlitz Gold-Copper Mining Co. Inc. in AZ, 1917. Unissued certificate no. 300. Unsigned. Green border, vignette of underground blast hole drilling at top center, uncancelled, 9 x 12, VF condition with one fold with clear tape on back, one inch chip upper right, slight chips left edge. Company is probably related to the Austerlitz group of mines owned by A.H. Noon of Nogales and under lease and option to Camphius & Ries of El Paso, Texas. The mine was developed by a 150 ft. shaft and 2 tunnels, 600 ft. and 300 ft. long. Copper, gold, silver mineralization assaying from $4 to $40 per ton occurs in a quartz fissure vein in porphyry. Ore shipments totaling over $200,000 reported through 1919. [Ref: 1920, p.329] Est. $25-50

1133. Santa Cruz. Nogales. Providencia Mining Co. Incorporated in Arizona in 1905. Certificate no. 222 issued to Charles E. Bardwell for 500 shares in 1905 at Worcester, Mass. Signed by president, John W. Candler and J.D. Barnes, secretary. Printer - Goes. Black border with gold safety print, three vignettes, upper left and right of placer miners, and double sluice box with dam upper center, 8x11. The company owned the Providencia mine located 12 miles northwest of Nogales. The original incorporators were H. C. Greenwell, E. C. Hardy and L. C. Gasche (Copper Handbook, Vol. XI, p. 726) VF condition with folds slightly creased. Est. $25-50

1134. Santa Cruz. Nogales. Red Rock Consolidated Mining Co. Incorporated in Arizona in 1903. Certificate no. 1276 issued to Morton Atwater for 100 shares in 1903. Signed by President and Secretary. names illegible. Orange border, vignette top center with underground mining scene, uncancelled, 8 x 11, mostly VF condition, 1 inch tear upper right, small tear left, creases upper left and lower right. Keith (1975, Index of Mining Properties in Santa Cruz County, Arizona, p.61) mentions a Red Rock Mining Co. that operated the Uncle Sam Mine in the Nogales or Gold Hill District. The deposit occurred in shear veins in quartz monzonite and the ore consisted of silver and gold bearing galena (lead) and chalcopyrite (copper). Total production through 1967 amounted to only about 250 tons of ore averaging about 9% lead and 8 ounces per ton of silver with minor copper. Est. $25-50

1135. Santa Cruz. Oro Blanco. Bye and Bye Gold and Silver Mining Company. Incorporated in New York in 1880. Certificate number 1004 issued to James F. McGean for 100 shares in 1881. Signed by President John Gere and Secretary Peter Bodine. Printed by Arthur & Bonnell, N.Y. Vignette top center of 4 miners working underground; at bottom center of New York State symbol. Uncancelled. Folds. &#x201Location of Mines Oro Blanco District, Arizona.” Black border and print on white paper. 7.5 x 10. Est. $200-500

1136. Santa Cruz. Oro Blanco. Esperanza Gold Mining and Development Co. Incorporated in Arizona in 1908. Certificate no. 12 issued to Alfred M. Field for 200 shares in 1909 at San Jose, California. Signed by H. J. Oswald, president, and secretary, name illegible. Gold embossed border seal and company name, gold safety print, vignette of underground miners and mining scene upper center, vignette of lady liberty lower center, uncancelled, 8 x 11, VF condition with folds, small nicks at fold edges, staple holes upper left. Printed by Goes. District from Garbani 2001. No other references found. Est.$25-50

1137. Santa Cruz. Oro Blanco. Franco-American Mining & Milling Co. Inc. in Terr. of AZ. Issued to Ella Gillingham for 1000 shares, cert #52, in 1896. Signed by Thos. Hurley president and Karl F. Miller secretary. Vignette at upper left of woman with American flag, shield and eagle. Black border with green safety print. Uncancelled. Printer - Albert B. King. NY. 8 x 11. Datelined New York. The Franco-American MC was operating in the Oro Blanco district and was mining gold, silver and copper. The president of this company is listed as K. F. Miller who signed as secretary of the Franco American M&MC. (Poole, 1898, p.183). Extremely fine. Est. $25-75

1138. Santa Cruz. Oro Blanco. Gold Eagle M&MC. #108. Inc. in Terr. of AZ.. Issued to Virgil M. Palmer for 2600 shares in 1906. Signed by Pres. H. Benton and Sec. R.L. Turner. Uncancelled. Vignette of spread-winged bald eagle atop stars and stripes shield. Black border, and lime green underprint and seal. Printed by Cunningham, Curtiss & Welch Co. 8” x 10 3/4”. Vf, foxing at top edge. There are several Golden Eagle mines in Arizona. At the time of this certificate only one of those mines was not owned, located in the Oro Blanco Mountains, Santa Cruz County. However, from our experience, the company name doesn’t always reflect the name of the property owned. (Tenney, History of Mining in Arizona, 1927). Est. $25-50

1139. Santa Cruz. Oro Blanco. Grant Mines Co. Incorporated in Arizona. No date. Certificate no. 349 issued to S. C. McCollom for 250 shares in 1904. Signed by President H. A. Hull and Secretary W. S. Calder. Gold border and seal, gold safety print, three vignettes, underground miners scene upper left and right, mountain landscape top center, uncancelled, 8 x 11, VF condition with folds, slight nicks at folds, two 1/8 inch punch holes at left edge. We could find no reference to this company among our resources. Printed by Goes. District from Garbani, verbal. Est. $25-50

1140. Santa Cruz. Oro Blanco. Grant Mining and Development Co. Incorporated in Arizona in 1907. Certificate no. 50 issued to Maxwell Stevenson, Jr. for 169,000 shares in 1907. Signed by Maxwell Stevenson, Jr., president, and Chas. H. Williamson, secretary. Printer - Security Bank Note Co., Phila. Green border, vignette of bald eagle with shield at top center, uncancelled, 8 x 11, VF condition with folds. We could find no reference to this company among our resources. District from Garbani 2001. Est. $50-100

1141. Santa Cruz. Oro Blanco. Grant United Mines Co. Incorporated in Arizona. No date. Certificate no. 134 issued to Frank J. Kovarik for 5,000 shares in 1904 at Chicago, Illinois. Signed by J.L. Reade, vice president, and John C. Allen, secretary. Gold border and seal, gold safety print, vignette of underground miners upper left, President Grant vignettes left and right of company name, vignette of small forest scene inside lower center border, uncancelled, 8 x 11. Printer S. D. Childs & Co., Chicago on Goes format. Fine condition with folds showing 2 inch splits, repaired with clear tape on back. We could find no reference to this company among our resources. District from Garbani 2001. Est. $50-100

1142. Santa Cruz. Oro Blanco. Idaho Consolidated Mines Co, Incorporated in Arizona. No date. Certificate no. 1308 issued to John Kearns for 1,625 shares in 1906. Signed by Irvin E. Rockwell, President, and H. Rattray Greig, Secretary. Black border with vignettes of miners in border corners and side centers, vignette of underground mining scene upper left, uncancelled 8 x 11, VF condition with folds, 1 inch tear on fold. We could find no references to Idaho Consolidated Mines Company and there are many mines with the name “Idaho” in the western United States. Garbani locates the mine at Oro Blanco. Est. $25-50

1143. Santa Cruz. Oro Blanco. Idaho Gold Mines Development Co. Incorporated in Arizona. Certificate no. 796 issued to Hugh McMinn for 100 shares in 1903. Signed by vice President and Secretary, names illegible. Black border with vignettes of miners in border corners and side centers, vignette of underground mining scene upper left, uncancelled 8 x 11, VF condition with folds, 1 inch tear on fold. We could find no references to Idaho Consolidated Mines Company and there are many mines with the name “Idaho” in the western United States. Garbani locates the mine at Oro Blanco. Est. $25-75

1144. Santa Cruz. Oro Blanco. Yellow Jacket Mines Co. Incorporated in Arizona in 1903. Certificate no. 382 issued to Frank Silliman, Jr. for 1000 shares in 1915 at Philadelphia, Pa. Signed by Frederick W. Gourlay, President and name illegible, Secretary. Black border with, uncancelled, 8 x 12, VF with folds and staple holes upper left. This may be the company that controlled the Yellow Jacket low grade gold mine, which was staked in 1875 in the Oro Blanco district. The district was dormant until 1893 when it reopened until again closing in 1902. [Ref: Tenney 1929, p287, 321]. Est. $25-75

1145. Santa Cruz. Patagonia. Mineral Deposits of the Santa Rita and Patagonia Mountains, Arizona. Department of the Interior United States Geological Survey, George Otis Smith, Director, Bulletin 582, By Frank C. Schrader. 1915. 373 pages. This bulletin covers the geology, mineral deposits, and mines in the Santa Rita and Patagonia Mountains. There are black and white pictures of some of the mines as well as ore samples. There are drawings showing claims, ore deposits, and underground workings. There are tables containing mine outputs. Geological and mining claim maps are included. This bulletin is hard bound with a dark red cover, with a black binding edge. The bulletin pages are glossy white paper with black print. The first page has DePauw University Library stamped on it. One of the maps is torn also. Very good condition. Size 5 3/4 X 9”. Est. $25-75

Santa Cruz. Patagonia. Please see Pima, Arivaca and Cerro Colorado for related material.


1146. Santa Cruz. Patagonia. Flux Mining Co, Incorporated in Arizona in 1918. Certificate no. 25 issued to Anna M. Kenney for 25 shares in 1919. Signed by John M. McGregor, President and Secretary, name illegible. Gold border and seal, vignette of underground mining scene in upper left, uncancelled, 9 x 10, Extremely fine to mint condition, no folds or tears. Company organized in 1918 to operate the Flux mine formerly operated by the Hardshell-Flux Mining and Development Company dissolved in 1910. Company erected a mill and installed other machinery at the mine which produced silver-lead ores from a shear in limestone from about 1918 to 1921. Mine developed by a 130 ft shaft and 5,000 ft of workings. Ores reported to average 5 oz. silver per ton and 10% lead. In 1922 the company went into receivership and all of the equipment which cost $40,000 was offered for sale. [Ref: 1925CH, p.308] Est. $25-50

1147. Santa Cruz. Patagonia. Four Metals Mining Co, Incorporated in Arizona in 1903. Certificate no. 376 issued to A.H. George for 100 shares in 1905. Signed by Lloyd B. Christy, President, and F.L. Blumer , Secretary. Gold border with gold safety print, three vignettes upper left and right are of underground mining scenes, center top is landscape of mountains, uncancelled, 8 x 11, VF condition with folds. The company held 40 claims, including the Chamberlain tunnel which produced a small test shipment of copper, lead, silver, and gold ores to the El Paso smelter. [Ref: 1905CH, p. 411, 1906CH, p. 495] Est. $50-100

1148. Santa Cruz. Patagonia. Happy Jack Mining & Reduction Co.. Incorporated in 1910 in Arizona Prospectus, 16 pages, include 6 black & white photos, green paper cover with green cord binding, 6 x 9. Proposes developing the companies claims in the Wrightson mining district. Mines have several workings including a shallow shaft and 950 ft. tunnel carrying gold- and silver-bearing lead and copper ores. Several of the assays run from 0.1 to 1.32 oz per ton gold, 10 to 68 oz silver per ton, 3.6 to 15.7% copper, and 7.6 to 38.6% lead. Est. $150-300

1149. Santa Cruz. Patagonia. Hardshell Mining Co. Incorporated in New Mexico in 1918. Certificate no. 1366 issued to E.H. Whiting & Co. in 1921. Signed by W. Murray Sanders, vice President, and D.M. Stevenson, Secretary. Green border, light green safety print, uncancelled, 9 x 12, VF condition with folds and minor staple holes left side, 1/4 inch tear right side. Company held the Hardshell mine, formerly operated by the Hardshell -Flux Mining and Development Co. which company was dissolved in 1910. The mine is 6 to 9 miles from Patagonia and produced silver ores with some lead, copper, gold, and about 30% manganese. Jig concentrates in 1919 averaged 40% manganese, 12% silica, 15 ounce per ton silver, and 10% lead. In 1923 the property was sold to Fortuna Consolidated Mining Co. but the deal fell through when Hardshell increased their capitalization in 1923, and became listed on the New York Curb. This was regarded as a stock selling proposition of dubious merit. However the Hardshell mine had been a great mine in its day. The company was reported dead” in 1926. [Ref: 1924CH, p. 328, 1926CH, p. 274, 1920CH, p.330] Est. $25-75

1150. Santa Cruz. Patagonia. Humphrey Mining Co. Incorporated in Arizona in 1943. Certificate no. 4 issued to James V Robins for 1 share in 1943. Signed by W. C. Humphrey, President, and name illegible, Secretary. Black border with gold sub-border, safety print , word common as gold underprint, and seal, uncancelled, 8 x 11, Extremely fine condition with folds. Keith (1975, Index of Mining Properties in Santa Cruz County, Arizona, p.81) reports a Humphrey Mining Company that operated the Pride of the West Mine in the Patagonia district. The Pride of the West Mining and Milling Company (which see) operated this mine in the early part of the 20th century. Est. $25-50


1151. Santa Cruz. Patagonia. Montana & Arizona Mining and Development Co. Incorporated in Arizona. No date. Certificate no. 8 issued to Jennie H. Strong for 100 shares in 1921. Signed by John Willis, President, and W.H. McNulty, Secretary. Brown border, vignette of American Eagle above American flag in upper left, uncancelled, 8 x 11, VF condition with folds, 1/4 inch tear upper left edge. Company is probably same as Montana & Arizona Mining Company which was taken over by Mowry & Arizona Dev. Co., Incorporated in 1923. Company held the Bullwhacker mine developed by a 120 ft shaft. Ore occurs as silver-bearing galena and sphalerite at the contact between limestone and quartz monzonite. Prospect inactive in 1931. [Ref: 1931CH, p.378, p.382] Est. $25-75

1152. Santa Cruz. Patagonia. Morning Glory MC Prospectus. H.W. Reichard, President, and W.L. Houck, Secretary. Engineers’ summary reports on the Morning Glory property listed the company as consisting of 12 claims, only two of which were in primary operation: the Morning Glory and the Evening Glory. Exploration in upper levels produced over 50,000 tons, mined and shipped, at a depth of about 256’, with cross drifts every 50’. Ore netted about $10 per ton, 2.75% copper, and about 3 oz. of silver. Centerfold gives a cross section of the main vein and tunnel. 9” x 12”. Vf, foxing around edges. Est. $75-150

1153. Santa Cruz. Patagonia. Mowry Mines Letterhead, Patagonia Arizona. Lot of three pieces. The first piece is a Mowry Mines letterhead dated 1904, to A. J. Locke, Agt. From J. N. Curtis as manager of American Industrial Development Co., The second piece is a Patagonia Commercial Company Dr. letterhead dated 1904. This is an order for goods. The third piece is a letter head from The Mowry Mines Company, J. N. Curtis, General Manager dated 1905, and is signed by J. N. Curtis. Sizes 8 1/2 X 8 1/2” and 8 1/2 X 11”. Fine. Est. $75-100

1154. Santa Cruz. Patagonia. Patagonia Mines and Development Co. Incorporated in Arizona in 1913. Certificate no. 81 issued to name illegible for 175 shares in 1913. Signed by Thomas Ewing, President, and John A. Campbell, Secretary. Orange border, vignette top center of underground mining scene, uncancelled, 8 x 11, Extremely fine condition, with folds. The company held various claims in the Patagonia district including the Santa Rita, Oklahoma, Wolfton, and Producer. Shipments made in 1914 from the Patagonia to the Copper Queen smelter assayed 30 oz. silver, 13.72% copper, netting $46.28 per ton. The company also held the San Antonio mine in the Sierra Azul mountains 30 miles southwest of Cananea, Sonora, Mexico. [Ref: 1912CH p.705, 1916CH p.912] Est. $50-150

1155. Santa Cruz. Patagonia. Report of the Secretary of War, dated 1858, 35th Congress, 1st Session, Senate, Ex. Doc. No. 39. Report is Statement showing “what officers of the army, belonging to the several regiments in service in the field, or at remote or frontier stations”, are now absent from duty, and the cause of such absence in each case”, 4 page document 9 x 6, Excellent condition. Page 3 notes under the heading “Third Artillery”, that Sylvester Mowry, First lieutenant is Absent by permission. “It being represented to the War Department that he is the delegate elect from Arizona, and also that he will be permitted soon to take his seat in the House of Representatives.” Page 2 notes under the heading Dragoons”, that James H. Carleton, Captain, was reported on leave of absence, Page 3 notes under the heading “Fourth Artillery”, that Samuel P. Heintzelman, Major, was reported on leave of absence. Lieutenant Sylvester Mowry purchased the Patagonia Mine in 1860, after it had failed under the original owners, a number of U.S. Army officers. Mowry renamed the mine, after himself. . This was the first major deposit that was rediscovered and located by Americans after this region was acquired through the Gasden Purchase. Mowry operated the mine during the early part of the Civil War, and eventually lost ownership of the property in June, 1862 owing to accusations by General James H. Carleton that lead from his mine was supplied to the Confederates. Mowry was jailed at Fort Yuma, then released after 6 months without being brought to trial. During the War, the mine was operated by an agent of Carleton’s, until 1864. After the war, the mine was returned to Mowry, having been gutted both in ore and infrastructure. He tried, unsuccessfully, to raise the capital needed to reopen the mine, but was unable to do so before his death in 1871. He authored a book in 1864 entitled Arizona and Sonora, …History and Resources of the Silver Region of North America. Over the subsequent years, the mine was operated intermittently, including the short period of time it was under the ownership of the Santa Cruz Mines and Smelter Company, incorporated in 1906 in Arizona. Santa Cruz Mines was formed as a reorganization of the Alto Consolidated Mines, Smelting and Transportation Co., which operated the Alto Mine in the Salero District in the Santa Rita Mountains and the Mowry Mines Co. A rail line between Patagonia and Mowry was being considered allowing Alto ore to be treated at the Mowry smelter, however, the panic of 1907 put an end to those plans in July of that year and the Alto mine reverted to the original company the same year. The main shaft caved in 1928 and no further work has likely been done on the property since then. Samuel P. Heintzelman was one of the founders of the Sonora Exploring and Mining Company, (SEMC) which was begun in 1854 as an investment in mines in southern Arizona together with Chas. Poston, William Wrightson and mining engineer Herman Ehrenberg. Heintzelman was a military man who had been involved with the exploration of the territory for numerous years. They made as their camp the crossing of the Colorado River at Fort Yuma, which they later laid out as Colorado City (Yuma). It was not until 1856 that their idea of exploring for precious metals actually got off the ground while Heintzelman was stationed across the Ohio River from Cincinnati. Poston and Heintzelman then formalized the idea they had concocted while at Fort Yuma in 1854. Hamilton, in Resources of Arizona published in 1884, stated that the Arizona Mining Company was formed by Poston and Heintzelman in 1855 at the same time as the Sonora Exploring and Mining Company. The Arizona Mining Co. appears to have been owned by the same people, but may have been technically under the control of the SEMC. When Raphael Pumpelly went to the mines in the early 1860’s with Poston and others, they were run off by the Apaches, afraid for their lives. Indeed, Poston’s brother, William Wrightson, and others were killed by the Apaches while surveying on one of their mining ventures in 1861. The 1855 date of formation of the company is backed up in Heintzelman’s biography Samuel Peter Heintzelman and the Sonora Exploring and Mining Co. written by North in 1980. North related that Heintzelman was the one selling the SEMC stock in Cincinnati while he was stationed there. He sold to wealthy Cincinnati merchants, Brown Bros. & Co. of London, Samuel Colt (firearms manufacturer) and others. In August of 1856 the group reached Tucson, then moved south to Tubac, where Company headquarters were established in an old Spanish presidio. From there, Heintzelman, Poston, Ehrenberg, Brunckow, Wrightson and others carried out their explorations mostly under the name Sonora Exploring and Mining Co., but also as the Arizona Mining Co., which was probably a wholly owned subsidiary, though this was not a common practice at the time. The Company bought the Arivaca Ranch, which contained most or all of the mines that were known to be worked historically by the Spanish and Mexicans in the 1700’s and early 1800’s before the Apache wars of the early and mid nineteenth century. (Please see the section on Arivaca in this catalog for more information on the early period.) By February 1, 1857, Fred Brunckow had reported the “discovery of a vein of silver ore located about one mile from the summit of the southeastern side of the Cerro Colorado. He named the vein the Heintzelman Mine,” wrote North. Records of just which of the two companies controlled which mines seems obfuscated in the historical record. However the SEMC had complete control. The AMC was an unused securities vehicle, idle until it’s needed use in 1863-4 as discussed later. In 1860, the company reported that they had sold over $45,000 in metals produced from the mine, and had on hand another $26,000 ready for shipment. Heintzelman, the president, had reported in an 1858 letter “that all the ore smelted to that date yielded $928 per ton.” (Please see sections on Arizona Mining Co. and Santa Cruz Mines and Smelter Company). (Tenney, 1929, pp 289-293, 315-316). Est. $100-200

1156. Santa Cruz. Patagonia. Ruby Copper Co, Incorporated in Arizona in 1912. Certificate no. 1125 issued to George W. Lovejoy for 172 shares in 1913 at Kansas City, Mo. Signed by F.D. Reasor, President, and C.E. Sweet, Secretary. Black border with three vignettes, upper left and right of underground mining scenes, center top of landscape with mill and smelter, uncancelled, 6 x 10, VF condition with folds. Property consists of 9 mining claims named the Lee group, 13 miles northwest of Patagonia. Oxidized and sulfide copper ores occur in limestone and sediments developed by a 460 ft shaft and 5,000 of workings. High-grade ore ranges to 27% copper, 100 oz per ton silver, and some gold values. The company completed a number of churn drill holes in 1920. [Ref: 1912, CH, p.772, 1920, CH, p.333] Est. $25-75

1157. Santa Cruz. Patagonia. Santa Cruz Mines & Smelter Co. Incorporated in 1906 in Arizona. Certificate number 143 issued to Cyrus D. Jones in 1906 for 20 shares. Signed by President H. R. Foster and Secretary F. H. Johnson. No vignette. Black border with green safety print and gold seal on white paper. Uncancelled. Printed by Goes. 8.5 x 11. This company was formed as a reorganization of the Alto Consolidated Mines, Smelting and Transportation Co., which operated the Alto Mine in the Salero District in the Santa Rita Mountains and the Mowry Mines Co. which operated the Mowry Mine in the Patagonia Mountains. A rail line between Patagonia and Mowry was being considered allowing Alto ore to be treated at the Mowry smelter, however, the panic of 1907 put an end to those plans in July of that year and the Alto mine reverted to the original company the same year. The Mowry was the first major deposit that was rediscovered and located by Americans after this region was acquired through the Gadsden Purchase. A number of U.S. Army officers were the original owners in 1858 of what was at that time called the Patagonia Mine. The early operations of the property were a failure and it was sold in 1860 to Lieutenant Sylvester Mowry, who renamed it after himself. Mowry operated the mine during the early part of the Civil War, and eventually lost ownership of the property owing to accusations that lead from his mine was supplied to the Confederates. During the War, the mine was operated by an agent of Mowry’s accuser. After the war, the mine was returned to Mowry, having been gutted both in ore and infrastructure. He tried, unsuccessfully, to raise the capital needed to reopen the mine, but was unable to do so before his death in 1871. Over the subsequent years, the mine was operated intermittently, including the short period of time it was under the ownership of this company. The main shaft caved in 1928 and no further work has likely been done on the property since then. (Tenney, 1929, pp 289-293, 315-316). Est. $50-100

1158. Santa Cruz. Patagonia. Santa Cruz Mines & Smelter Co. Incorporated in 1906 in Arizona. $1000 Special Contract Seven Percent bond. Signed by President George A. Braton and Secretary Charles E. Prior. No vignette. Green border and underprint with gold seal on white paper. Fifteen of fifteen coupons attached. 10 x 16. Printer not listed. See a description of this company above. Est. $75-150

1159. Santa Cruz. Patagonia. Santa Cruz Mining Co. Incorporated in Arizona in 1901. Certificate no. 1284 issued to M.J.B. Hutchinson for 1,250 shares in 1903. Signed by W.W. Hall, President and Geo.W. Bolen, Secretary. Black border gold safety print, three vignettes upper left and right of placer gold miners, top center of large double sluice box placer gold operation, uncancelled, 8 x 10, VF condition with folds, slight nicks at two fold edges. Company held mine in Harshaw district near Patagonia. Mine was discovered in 1860, opened in 1890, then reopened in 1900. The property was developed by two shafts, with the deepest to 150 ft. Ore was hosted by a 20 ft wide fissure vein with 8.5% copper, 20 oz. silver, 5.09% nickel and $25 gold per ton (1.25 oz per ton), mainly in chalcocite ore. [Ref: 1904CH, p.633] Est. $50-100

1160. Santa Cruz. Patagonia. Santa Rita Land and Mining Company. Incorporated in Colorado in 1881. Certificate number 445 issued to W. E. Dow for 26 shares in 1882. Signed by president Pliny Nickerson and secretary Edward H. Mason. Printed by American Bank Note Co, NY. Vignette on left shows three miners working at the bottom of a shaft; vignette in the center shows cowboys working cattle. Uncancelled. Folds. Black border with black print on white paper. Size 8 x 11”. Tenney (1929, p. 262) reports that the Santa Rita Lands and Mines Company is a reorganization of the San Xavier Mining and Smelting Company by Col. Sykes in 1882, who originally purchased the San Xavier mine in 1880. Blake (1860, p. 13, 15) states that the San Xavier Mining Co. was organized in San Francisco, in 1857. The mine is near Tucson, Arizona. The San Xavier Silver mine is 35 miles from Tubac, which was a prominent point in the territory of Sonora. Mowry (1864 p. 81) reports that the San Xavier mine was worked during the time of the Jesuits, and which appears exceedingly rich. This mine was also was also owned by the Arizona Land and Mining Company. Farish (1915, p. 73) reports that the Arizona Land and Mining Co. owned a mine situated north of the Rancho of Sopori. The company owned land thirty-two leagues square on which is situated the old silver mine of San Xavier. Other veins are equally rich and found on the center of the property, on the Sierra Tinaja. The Company was incorporated in Providence, R. I., with a capital of $2,000,000. President S. G. Arnold and treasurer Alfred Anthony, who was also president of the Jackson Bank of Providence. N. Richmond Jones, Jr., is the engineer-in-chief of this mine, and the Sopori Mine.” Mowry (1864 p. 127) states that the San Xavier mine was in the state of Sonora, in northern Mexico. Very ornate and important piece. Rare. Est. $400-800

1161. Santa Cruz. Patagonia. Southern Arizona Mining Co. Incorporated in Arizona in 1912. Certificate no. 2452 issued to George W. Lovejoy for 24 shares in 1917. Signed by H.A. Sutermeister, President, and E. Moore, assistant Secretary. Black border with miner vignettes at corners and side centers, green seal and safety print, vignette of underground mining scene in upper left, uncancelled, 8 x 11, excellent condition with folds. Company held the Sweet group of claims in the Wrightson mining district (Patagonia) with gold-bearing copper ore in a contact deposit between granite and monzonite. Mine is developed by a 365 ft. shaft. Company was subsequently reorganized as the Consolidated Southern Arizona Mining Co. [Ref: 1918CH, p.502, 1920CH, p.333, 1925CH, p.286]. Est. $25-75

1162. Santa Cruz. San Rafael. Experiment of the Santa Cruz: Colin Cameron’s San Rafael Cattle Company, 1882-1893. By Jane Abigail Wayland. 1964. 118 pages. This is a copy of a Thesis Submitted to the Faculty of the Department of History, University of Arizona. This Thesis describes Colin Cameron and what he contributed to the cattle industry of Arizona., and his San Rafael Cattle Company. A black 3 ring binder is the cover for the Xeroxed sheets -- because these are copied sheets, we are not providing an illustration.. Size 10 X 12”. Very fine. Est. $20-30

Santa Cruz. Tyndall. Please see also Pima County Aztec district.

1163. Santa Cruz. Tyndall. Alto Copper Co. Incorporated in Maine in 1905. Certificate number 92 issued to William V. Racunes in 1905 for 2 shares. Signed by President George A. Bratm and Asst. Treasurer C. W. Lawrence. Printer not noted. No vignette. Uncancelled. Folds. Black border and print with orange safety print and gold seal on white paper. 8 x 10. The Alto claims and mine were locate within the Tyndall district. Est. $25-50

1164. Santa Cruz. Tyndall. Alto Copper Co. Special Contract 7% $100 Bond. Incorporated in Maine in 1905. Certificate number C238 registered to William V. Racunes in 1905. Signed by President George A. Bratm and Asst. Treasurer C. W. Lawrence. Printed by Brown, Lent & Pett, NY. No vignette. Uncancelled. Folds. Black print and orange border and underprint with gold seal on white paper. Two pages plus five coupons attached. 10 x 16. (Copper Handbook, 1912, p. 290). If in southern sierritas, see also Tenney, p. 315. Est. $25-75

1165. Santa Cruz. Tyndall. Arizona Consolidated Gold and Copper Mines Co. Incorporated in Arizona in 1948, Certificate no. 6 issued to Herbert and/or Signe Anderson for 100 shares in 1948. Signed by John F. Johnson, President, and Kenneth S. Johnson, Secretary. Black border, gold seal and safety print, three vignettes at top, left of underground miners, right of placer miners, and center of headframe and mills. Headframe positioned incorrectly over trestle without shaft. Uncancelled, 6 x 10, extremely fine, with minor folds, one pin hole. Company Inactive in 1956, but no mine location given. Garbani places company in Tyndall mining district. [Ref: 1956CH, p. 513] Est. $25-50

1166. Santa Cruz. Tyndall. Arizona Gold and Copper Co. Incorporated in Arizona in 1900, Certificate no. 662 issued to William P. Luann (?) in 1901. Signed by Floyd B. Wilson, President and William H. Gray, Treasurer. Green border and seal, three vignettes include mountain landscape with smelter reduction works in top center, and underground miners in upper left and upper right. Five-cent US tax stamp affixed upper left corner. Uncancelled 8 x 10, VF condition folds with tears. The company held three copper- lead-silver mines in the Tyndall district, in the Santa Rita mountains, a 50 ton per day mill, and an 80 ton per day smelter in nearby Patagonia. [ref: 1905CH, p 203] Est. $25-75

1167. Santa Cruz. Tyndall. Empire State Silver Mining Co. Incorporated in New York. Certificate number 11 issued to Arnold Hart for 50 shares in 1867. Signed by President A. B. Bull and Secretary D. A. Clemp. Datelined Utica, NY. Printed by Corlies, Macy & Co., NY. Vignette top center of New York state symbol; at top right of allegorical robed woman and at left of mining scene. Uncancelled. Black border and print on white paper. 25-cent insurance stamp lower right corner. 6 x 11. Folds. This is not the same as the Empire Mine near the Mowry mines, as reported by Browne in 1868, or the Empire mine of the Tombstone district. [Garbani, 2001] Est. $200-400

1168. Santa Cruz. Tyndall. Happy Thought & Fairview Mining Co, Incorporated in Arizona. No date. Certificate no. 1092 issued to A.M. White for 250 shares in 1905. Signed by E.J. Freeman, President, and W.E. Gifford, Secretary. Black border and orange underprint, seal, vignette of underground mining scene in upper left, uncancelled, 8 x 11, VF condition with folds, small piece of scotch tape on reverse. Located in the Tyndall mining district, east of Arivaca, east of the Santa Cruz river, 60 miles south of Tucson. This was an old mine as evidenced by arrastras and old slag dumps from smelting the gold, silver, copper, and lead ores. [Ref: Burchard, 1881, p. 307, Item 314]. Est.$50-100

1169. Santa Cruz. Tyndall. Onyx King MC Prospectus. Tells of the purity of Onyx marble, essentially claiming onyx investment to be more valuable than gold, silver, copper, lead or zinc. Shows pictures of onyx formations on mountainsides and in caves. Blue cover with several stains. The Prospectus mentions location of the property in the Santa Rita Range. Schrader (1915, p. 361) notes that several claims had been located in the Greaterville district to develop “onyx” deposits, but it was thought they were too calcareous to be of commercial value. This company turned out to be a little shady as the onyx as what the company claimed to be onyx was not. Est. $75-100

1170. Santa Cruz. Tyndall. Rosario SMC. Incorporated in New York in 1867 or 1868, issued 1868 to Wm. D. Sinclair for 20 shares, signed by R. A. Sinclair as president and S. R. Selden as secretary. Datelined New York. Black border and print. Underground mining vignette. 25-cent certificate stamp attached at left. Corporate seal had a crossed pick & shovel with “AZ” (Arizona). Uncancelled. 6.5 x 11”. This company operated a mine 1.5 miles northwest of the famous Salero mine in the old Aztec district, which late became known as the Tyndall district. It is about 7 miles west of Patagonia. The mine was worked by Mexicans or Spaniards in the early days (1700’s – 1800’s) and is one of the early mines discussed by Lenon and others in their papers in Canty’s Mining History of Arizona in three volumes. It was financed by some of Heintzelman’s and Colt’s associates in New York. Here, northwest quartz veins cutting diorite were mined (mostly prospected) for gold and silver for decades, even though by 1900 there were still less than 1000 feet of underground workings. The ore was reported to average about $25 per ton, which might be why it was merely in an advance stage of prospecting, when Schrader wrote Mineral Deposits of the Santa Rita and Patagonia Mountains for the USGS in 1915. For anyone collecting certificates, documents, or ore specimens from the old Spanish mines in Arizona, this mine should be on your list. This company is not to be confused with Rosario, Mexico. Very Rare. Est. $800-1600

1171. Santa Cruz. Tyndall. Rosario SMC. $100 second Mortgage bond, payable in silver coin. Coupons attached. Incorporated in New York in 1867 or 1868, issued 1870 to bearer, signed by R. A. Sinclair as president and I. G. Forman as secretary. Black border and print. No vignette. Corporate seal had a crossed pick & shovel with “AZ” (Arizona) Uncancelled. 13 x 10.5” Please see the above lot for the story. Extremely Rare. Est. $400-800

1172. Santa Cruz. Tyndall. Santa Rita Copper Mining and Smelting Company. Incorporated in Arizona in 1901. Certificate no. 2591 issued to Wm. C. Port for 800 shares in 1905, certificate 2591. Signed by president, name illegible and C.F. Elliott, secretary. Green border, three vignettes with underground miners upper left and right, mountain scene with mill and smelter upper center, uncancelled, 8 x 11, VF condition with folds, overprint stamped in red of “purchasers assume no liability”, also Notice stamped in purple. The company held claims in the Tindell district, Santa Rita mountains 38 miles south of Tucson. The property contained 10 veins in granite porphyry. Four of the veins were being developed and averaged 8 to 30 ft. wide with assays of 18% copper, 6 to7% lead, 1to 3% zinc, 40 oz. silver per ton, and $2 to $8 gold (0.1 to 0.4 oz. per ton). The property was developed by 5 shafts of 20 ft to 110 ft deep with about 1,000 ft. of underground development. In 1906 it was reported that the company’s offices had closed, the company had changed officers repeatedly, and that it was a mere stock-jobbing scheme. [Ref: 1904CH, p.635, 1905CH, p. 712, 1906CH, p.898] Est. $25-75

1173. Santa Cruz. Tyndall. Santa Rita Copper Mining and Smelting Company. Incorporated in Arizona in 1901. Certificate no. 2236 issued to R.W. Wiley for 500 shares in 1906, certificate 2236. Signed by Geo. P. Myers, president and M. Wilson, secretary. Green border, three vignettes with underground miners upper left and right, mountain scene with mill and smelter upper center, uncancelled, 8 x 11, VF condition with folds, one inch tear at lower left fold, overprint stamped in red of “purchasers assume no liability”, ten-cent tax revenue stamp affixed upper left corner. See lot above for the story. Est. $25-75

1174. Santa Cruz. Tyndall. Santa Rita Copper Mining and Smelting Company. Incorporated in Arizona in 1901. Certificate no. 3585 issued to Mrs. M.B. Cassidy for 100 shares in 1906, certificate 3585. Signed by Geo. P. Myers, president and M. Wilson, secretary. Green border, three vignettes with underground miners upper left and right, mountain scene with mill and smelter upper center, uncancelled, 8 x 11, VF condition with folds, overprint stamped in red of “purchasers assume no liability”. See lot above for the story. Est. $25-75

1175. Santa Cruz. Tyndall. Trenton Mining Co. Incorporated in Arizona in 1906. Certificate no. A20 issued to Mary T. Cornell for 500 shares in 1907. Signed by Melvin Stephens, President, and James L. Dillingham, Secretary. Brown border, vignette of underground mining crew, with mining vignettes in border at upper left and right. &#x201Preferred Stock” in red underprint. uncancelled, 9 x 11, VF condition with minor folds, and slight tears at folds. The Trenton Mining Co. held properties 8 miles west of Patagonia, in the Tyndall district and developed a 12-foot wide vein of copper-silver-lead ores assaying 3% copper, 3 to 15% lead and up to 10 ounces silver per ton. [Ref: 1910CH, p 1693] Est. $50-100

1176. Santa Cruz. Tyndall. Wisconsin and Arizona Mining Co., Inc. in WI, 1884, issued 1884 to William Goodell for 200 shares, signed by O. M. Sanger as president and Jos. McRey as secretary. Vignette below masthead of five underground miners at work. White paper, black border and print, blue corporate seal. Printed by J. Knauber & Co., Milwaukee. 9 x 10”. Uncancelled. Folds. &#x201Helvetia, Josephine and Emma Mines”, “Mines in Tyndall Mining District, Pima Co., Arizona.” Cert No.44. The district was located on the west side of the Santa Rita Mountains. Gold, silver, copper and lead production came from veins in granite cut by diorite and capped by Tertiary volcanics. Ref. USGS Bull. 507. The Helvetia mine was probably named after Helvetia Camp, located about 16 miles northeast in the Silver Bell District in which rich placer claims and large copper deposits were successfully being worked at the time. (Hamilton, 1884, p. 236). The Helvetia mine was located at the head of Josephine canyon and the Josephine and Emma mines presumably were nearby. Mineral deposits were discovered in the area in the 1860’s and, “In the late seventies or early eighties a dozen or more claims were patented by eastern companies, which later learned that the claims would not pay to work in those days.” (USGS Bull. 582, p. 188 & Plate 1). Est. $200-500

1177. Santa Cruz. Washington. Pride of the West Mining & Milling Co. Inc. in CO, 1901. #19 issued to Marriott C. Smyth for 1100 shares in 1901 at Denver, Colorado. Signed by Arthur R. Wilfley, Pres and H. E. Fiske, Sec. Black border, gold safety print, vignettes of miner with pick in corners and side borders, vignette of underground mining scene upper left, uncancelled, 8 x 10, mostly VF condition with folds and 1 1/2 inch tears on top folds. 50 cent and $5 U.S. tax stamps affixed to upper left. Pride of the West mine opened in 1870, then closed due to Indian uprisings. Reopened in 1897, then closed in 1902. Silver, copper, lead, and zinc mine developed by main shaft about 300 feet deep. Property included an efficient 200 ton per day mill built with the metallurgical consultation of Mr. Wilfley, inventor of Wilfley tables. The mill operated with Wilfley tables and magnetic separators that produced three classes of concentrates: a copper concentrate, averaging 12 to 15% copper, an argentiferous galena concentrate averaging 50 - 60% lead and 100 - 120 ounces silver per ton, a zinc concentrate running 50 - 60% zinc. In 1902 the mine was producing 40 tons per day that netted $10,000 per month. [Ref: 1902CH p.335 1905CH p.665] Est. $50-100

1178. Santa Cruz. Wrightson. Mansfield M&SC. Incorporated in Arizona in 1906, issued 1908 to M. Gibbes for 200 shares, signed by W. H. Tyler as vice president and A. C. Sweet as secretary. Uncancelled. Eagle vignette, printed by Union Bank Note Co. in Kansas City. . This company owned the Sweet and Black Cap mines. We assume the secretary, A. C. Sweet, was the discoverer of the Sweet mine. His (honorary) place as secretary is a position held by other miners who got their properties financed in the mid-west or east. This company also staked a huge amount of claims around these mines, built a smelter in 1908, but never really got going. The mine closed in 1911, and the company reorganized in 1912 into the Ruby Copper Co and the Southern Arizona Mining Co. No production was recorded until 1924 when lessees ran the mine for about 2 years. [ref: Tenney p317-8, who neglected to tell the reader what district the mine was in]. Datelined Kansas City. Vf, folds. 8” x 11”. Est. $50-100

1179. Santa Cruz. Wrightson. Mansfield Mining & Smelting Co. Incorporated in Arizona in 1906. Certificate number 4627 issued to Harriet C. Dyer for 100 shares in 1907. Signed by Vice President M. P. Fyke and Secretary A. C. Sweet. Vignette upper left corner of bald eagle clutching shield, arrows and olive branch; at bottom center as part of border, heads of two dragons or griffins. Brown border and safety print on white paper. Uncancelled. Printed by Union Bank Note Co. K. C., MO. 8.5 x 10. Folds. See lot above for story. Est. $25-75

1180. Santa Cruz. Wrightson. Mansfield M&SC. Incorporated in Arizona in 1906. Uncancelled, first mortgage 6% gold bond, with 2 coupons attached. Signed by W. H. Tyler as vice president and A. C. Sweet as secretary. No vignettes. Green border, repaired at folds, where separated along entire length of folds. Datelined Kansas City, 1908. 10” x 15”. See lot above for story. Est. $100-200

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