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Online Bid Sheet

The James Garbani & Other Consignors
Arizona Mining Stock & Document Collection
Auction Date: Saturday, March 23, 2002
Absentee Bids Due: Friday, March 22, 6 pm PST

ARIZONA - Navajo & Pima

NAVAJO

862. Navajo. Holbrook. Arizona Co-Operative Mercantile Institution. Lot of three pieces. Circa 1903. All three pieces have beautiful letterheads of the Arizona Co-Operative Mercantile Institution. Each letterhead is different. One letterhead is from Snowflake, Arizona, another one is from St. Johns, Arizona, and the third is from Holbrook, Arizona. The body of the pieces deals with the purchasing of goods. All pieces have been folded with one having some small tears at the bottom. Size 8 1/2 X 11. Fine. Est. $75-150


863. Navajo. Holbrook. Arizona Co-Operative Mercantile Institution. Lot of two certificates. Incorporated in the Territory of Arizona. Certificate number 895 is issued to Charles F. Hulet for 15 shares dated 1897, and the other certificate number 917 is also issued to Charles F. Hulet for 30 shares dated 1898. Both datelined Holbrook, Arizona. Green company seal in lower left corner on certificate 917. Signed by president Jesse N. Smith and secretary Jno (John) R. Hulet. Printer Gast stationery Co. St. Louis. Vignette in the center towards the top of the certificate of the Arizona State Seal. Both certificates were cancelled in 1901. Folds and ripped at the left of center to show cancellation. Very fancy black border with black writing on white paper. Size 7 X 10”. John R. Hulet was secretary of the Arizona Co-op for quite some time. He had a son, Ernest Hulet, born at Snowflake, Arizona in 1900 that went on to run the company’s business. Jesse Smith was Hulet’s brother in law – his sister married John Hulet. [Arizona Biography, v4, 1930] This was a company store with Mormon ties and branches in several places. It had its beginnings when the Mormon Church purchased the company from Brigham Young’s son John Young, opening their doors in 1881. The store moved back and forth from Woodruff until 1888 when it permanently stayed in Holbrook. Est. $400-600

864. Navajo. Holbrook. Great Basin Oil Co. Incorporated in Arizona 1924. Issued to Alfred T. Houghton for 5 shares, cert #575, in 1924. Signed by S. Taylor president and Gilbert Loveland secretary. Vignette of a spread winged eagle. Blue border and gilt seal. Uncancelled. Printer - W. P. Jeffries Bank Note Printers, Los Angeles. 7 x 11. Garbani indicates that this company had operations in Navajo County. Extremely fine. Est. $25-75

865. Navajo. Winslow. Little Colorado Valley Map, c.1910. Blue paper with white lettering and map. Section grid with a map showing the drainage pattern of the Little Colorado River. The towns of Holbrook, St. Joseph, Hurdy, Winslow, Dennison, Canon Diablo and Andell are shown along a rail line. 14 x 16 when unfolded. Very fine. Est. $20-40

PIMA

866. Pima. Ajo. Ajo-Cornelia Copper Co Newspaper Clipping. This clipping came from the Ajo Copper News, Page 4 and 5. There is a blue stamped date of Mar 30 1917 at the top right center. The clipping tells that the Ajo-Cornelia Copper Co. is going to sell the remainder of its stock. There is a map of the Ajo Mining District on the right hand page that shows the mining claims of the Ajo-Cornelia Copper Co., and there relation to other mining companies. This clipping has fold marks, a small piece torn out of the middle fold, and some rears on the edges. Printed in black ink on brown paper. Glued to foam core. Newspaper size 15 3/4 X 21 3/4”. Overall size 19 3/4 X 25 1/2”. Est. $20-40

867. Pima. Ajo. Ajo Extension Copper Company. Incorporated in Arizona. No date. Certificate no. 38 issued to James K. Vinton for 1,000 shares in 1925. Signed by Joseph A. Hunter, president and Hagworthy, secretary. Orange border, vignette of lady turned left at top center, uncancelled, 10 x 12, good condition with folds, and various tears to 2 inches, also creases. This company is located in Ajo according to Garbani 2001. Est. $25-75

868. Pima. Ajo. Arizona Independent Vacuum Smelting Company. Incorporated in Arizona. No date. Certificate no. 49 issued to M.E. Chamberlain for 375 shares in 1906. Signed by H.B. Pape, president and J.R. Roddie, secretary. Green border, vignettes of underground mining scene upper left and right, vignette of mountain landscape with mills and smelter top center, print of vacuumizing furnace on reverse, uncancelled, 8 x 11, Fine condition with folds and up to 1 1/2 inch tears at folds. Company is probably the one formed to process the ores for the New Cornelia Copper Company at the New Cornelia orebody, Ajo. This was an “unsuccessful attempt in 1906, by a professor named Fred L. Mc Gahan for so-called vacuum smelter process which operated by principles opposed to all the laws that govern the physical universe. The process cost $30,000, and reportedly led to some shooting, suing, and indicting” [Ref: 1910CH, p.1280] Est. $200-400

869. Pima. Ajo. Calumet & Arizona Mining Co & New Cornelia Copper Co Newspaper Clipping. The clipping is from the Arizona Section of the El Paso Morning Times, dated January, 1918. The clipping tells where the mines are located, ore development, Smelter, and the building of the New Plant. There is a black and white photo of a Steam Shovel working at the New Cornelia Copper Co. and another black and white picture of the Railway Station and Plaza in Ajo, Arizona. Printed on brown paper with black print. Left had side of newspaper is cut irregularly. The newspaper page is glued to white foam core. Newspaper size 17 1/4 X 21 1/2”. Overall size 19 X 22 1/2”. Est. $20-40

870. Pima. Ajo. Cardigan Copper Company. Inc. in AZ, 1917. Certificate 94 issued to B.H. Sutherland for 100 shares in 1917. Signed by Phil E. Darbe, vp, and H.E. Frederickson, sec. Orange border with orange safety print, vignette of underground mining scene of miners working, uncancelled, 8 x 11, Extremely fine condition. Company held leases and options in the Ajo district with copper -silver ores in a contact vein. Shipments were made from an 85 ft. shaft that averaged 12% copper and 36 ounces silver per ton. Company reported to be dissolved in 1919. [Ref: 1920CH, p. 285] Est. $25-50

871. Pima. Ajo. Cornelia Consol. Copper Co. #975. Inc. in DE, 1916. Issued to Minor E. Chamberlain for 500 shares in 1922. Signed by J.A. Hunter as president and William Nickel as treasurer. Property consisted of 29 claims, making a contiguous group with combined area of about 500 acres, on the southern slope of the Ajo Mountains, adjoining the New Cornelia Company’s holdings at Ajo. Monzonite domes appeared in the main holdings, as well as dipping southwest under the rhyolite. The company expected this to be a trend throughout the area. New development was begun in 1919, where by the end of 1919, was a 350’ hole in “favorable ground”, in which was found ore containing gold and silver (Ref: Weed, 1920, p.285-86; 1922, p.260). Nice vignette of allegorical figure holding wreath, with mining in background. Green border and underprint. Printed by Security BNC. 9” x 12”. Xf. Est. $25-50

872. Pima. Ajo. Cornelia-Ajo Copper Company. Inc. in AZ, 1916. #2194 issued to Safe Deposit Trust Company of Baltimore and trustees under will of Israel Levenstein for 100 shares in 1919. Signed by Jas. P. Harvey, president and H.J. Schellenberg, treasurer. Green border with partial safety print inner border, vignette of underground miners with a stope drill, punch holes suggest certificate is cancelled, 9 x 12, VF condition with 6 punch holes at left. Company held 27 mining claims in the Ajo district that adjoins the New Cornelia porphyry copper mine. Several of the shallow pits and shafts carried assays of 1.5 to 38% copper. [Ref: 1918CH, p338] Est. $25-50

873. Pima. Ajo. Exploring, Mining, Leaching, and Concentrating of Copper Ores as related to the Development of Ajo, Arizona, to Mid-Year 1942. By Forrest R. Rickard. Copyright 1996. 347 pages. This is a paperback book covering the processes that were developed and/or used to mine and mill the Coppers Ores of the Ajo District. There are black and white pictures of mills and buildings. White cover with black print. There is a black and white picture of General John Campbell Greenway on the cover. Cover had two small folds that the corners. Inside pages are white with black print. Like new condition. Size 8 1/2 X 11”. Est. $25-50

874. Pima. Ajo. New Cornelia Copper Company. Lot of 2: (1) New Cornelia Copper Company, Inc. in DE, 1909. #9515 issued to Charles L. Wallis for 50 shares in 1918. Signed by Thomas Hoatson, vp and J.E. Kickler, asst. sec. Black border with vignette of underground mining scene with miners setting up drill, cancelled 1921 with star-shaped punch holes through signatures, 9 x 12, VF condition with folds, punch holes. (2) New Cornelia Copper Company, Inc. in DE, 1909. #4016 issued to Philip W. Birdseye for 10 shares in 1915. Signed by Thomas Hoatson, 2nd vice president and G.R. Campbell, secretary. Black border with vignette of underground mining scene with miners setting up drill, cancelled 1921 with punch holes through signatures, 9 x 12, VF condition with folds, punch holes. Company held claims covering the New Cornelia orebody, the main part of the Ajo porphyry copper deposit, with disseminated copper mineralization in quartz monzonite and brecciated rhyolite. In 1910 the company reported 25,000,000 tons of ore in sight estimated to average 4% copper, 2 oz silver per ton, and $2 gold per ton (0.10 oz per ton). One of the orebodies consisted of a 15 ft wide vein, carrying 3 to 15% copper. Mining was by underground methods. Early attempts at processing the ores included, in 1906, a “so-called vacuum smelter process which operated by principles opposed to all the laws that govern the physical universe. The process cost $30,000, and reportedly led to some shooting, suing, and indicting.” See: Arizona Independent Vacuum Smelting Company. Subsequently shipments were made to conventional smelters, then by 1918, the ores were processed on-site by acid leach, iron removal by sulfur dioxide towers, then production of electrolytic copper cathodes. By 1918, ore reserves were increased to 53,100,000 tons averaging 1.53% copper and 0.015 to 0.025 ounces gold per ton, and mining was by open-pit with steam shovels. [Ref: 1910CH, p.1280, 1918CH, p.339] Est. $25-75

875. Pima. Ajo. New Cornelia Copper Company. Lot of 2: Cert. #4933, B12603. Incorporated in Delaware in 1909. Issued to Downer & Co for 10 shares in 1921, and E. A. Pearce & Co. for 100 shares in 1929. Both signed by Hoatson as president. Purple and green borders. 9” x 12”. Vignettes of men loading ore into train cars. Vf. Cancelled by hole punches at signatures. VF. See lot above for story. Est. $25-75

876. Pima. Ajo. New Cornelia Exploration Co. Incorporated in Arizona in 1916. Certificate no. 63 issued to Capt. J.C. Rhea for 1300 shares in 1917. Signed by J.A. McDonald, president and H.K. Powell, secretary. Black border with gold safety print, border contains vignettes of miner in corners and side center, vignette of underground mining scene upper left, uncancelled, 8 x 11, VF condition with folds, 1/4 inch tears at fold, small chip lower right corner. This company is probably related to the New Cornelia Copper Co. which held the major porphyry copper deposit at Ajo. [Ref: 1918CH, p. 339] Est. $25-50

877. Pima. Ajo. Photo Postcards of the Cornelia Pit. Lot of 2. The first piece is a black and white picture titled. “Open Pit Copper mine – Ajo, Arizona. The second piece is a black and white picture titled “Loading Copper Ore, Phelps – Dodge Open Pit Mine Ajo, Arazona., L-57. Note misspelling. This card has a smudge in the upper right hand corner. Both cards are very fine. Size 3 1/2 X 5 1/2”. Est.$25-75

878. Pima. Ajo. University of Arizona Bulletin, Arizona Bureau of Mines, Geology and Ore Deposits of the Ajo Quadrangle, Arizona. By James Gilluly. January 1, 1937. Arizona Bureau of Mines, Geological Series No. 9. Bulletin No. 141. 83 pages. This bulletin covers the general geology, and the ore deposits of the Ajo Quadrangle. The cover is gray heavy paper with black print. The name Max. B. Lasskuhley is written on the cover. The bulletin pages are glossy white paper with black print. There are geological maps included. The cover has some light smudges and folds at the corners. There are pencil notes written on the pages in the upper right corners. Very good condition. Size 6 X 9”. Est. $25-75

879. Pima. Amole. Buena Vista Mining Co., incorporated in California in 1884, issued 1884 to H. H. Pearson for 500 shares, signed by Thomas N. Caswell as president and Daniel Buck as secretary as secretary. No Vignette. Black border and print. Printed by Crocker & Co., SF. 4x9”. Uncancelled. : District of Amole, County of Pima, Arizona.” This company held two claims about ten miles southwest of Tucson (at the time), the Buena Vista and the Good View, both near the Silver Blende mine. They were being worked in 1884, but no production data is available. Henry Pearson was the manager of the Baldwin Hotel in San Francisco. Caswell was a Grand Secretary at the Masonic Temple in San Francisco.[ref: Burchard 1885; SF Dir 1881] Est. $200-500

880. Pima. Amole. Catalina Mining Company. Incorporated in Arizona in 1902. Cerfiticate no. 346 issued to B.F.Barnes for 10,000 shares in 1909 at Philadelphia, Pa. Signed by vice president, name illegible, and secretary, name illegible. Gold border with gold safety print, vignette of underground mining scene upper left, uncancelled, 8 x 11, VF condition with folds, nicks to one inch tears on folds. Company held the Battle Axe mine in the Amole district near Tucson. The property contained spotty copper oxide and silicate minerals in irregular quartz veins in Cretaceous andesite. [AzBull 189, p.66] Est. $25-75

881. Pima. Amole. Mile Wide Copper Co Mining Claim Map. Circa 1905. This map shows the mining claims, holdings, cross section of underground workings of the Margarite and Copper King, roads, proposed town site holdings Santa Cruze River and the southern Pacific Railroad. There is some had written markings on the underground workings part of the map. Map has folds and a fold in the upper left corner. Printed in black ink on ivory paper. Glued to foam core. Map size 8 1/2 X 18”. Overall size 12 X 22”. Est. $50-150

882. Pima. Amole. Old Pueblo Copper Company. Incorporated in Arizona in 1903. Certificate no. 18 issued to Herbert A. Drachman for 250 shares in 1906. Signed by Alexander F. Rossi, president, and W. P. Haynes, secretary. Black border with vignettes of miner in each corner and side centers, vignette of underground miners upper left, gold safety print and seal, uncancelled, 8 x 11, VF condition with folds, 1/2 inch tear at fold. Described as Old Pueblo Mining & Milling Co. in the Copper Handbook. Company held the Old Pueblo mine, consisting of 9 claims in the Amole district 5 miles west of Tucson. The mine was developed by a 70 ft shaft and 600 ft. of workings which cut a 15 ton pocket of chalcocite averaging 33% copper, 16 ounces silver, and $2.50 gold per ton (0.12 ounces gold per ton). In October, 1907, the company made an initial shipment of ore, ranging 10 to 12% copper and $5 to $10 combined gold and silver values per ton. [1908CH, p.1076] Est. $25-75

PIMA. ARIVACA. Notes on Arivaca, one of the most historical districts in Western America.

The mines at Arivaca are among the oldest in Arizona. There is evidence that these mines were first prospected by Spaniards as early as the late 1600’s, however, there is a poor written record on the matter, as one might expect for early prospecting and exploration in new territory. The written record certainly starts about 1751-1752 about the time of the Pima Apache revolt, when numerous writers noted that mining at Arivaca stopped with the revolt. Thus mining was certainly taking place before that time, but few records exist prior that might shed light on the activity. The region was also undergoing a geographic naming process, and Arivaca may have been called something else by the early Spaniard explorers and prospectors. Spanish miners continued activity at Arivaca through 1767, when increased numbers of raids by Apaches forced closure.

The first reports of ore grades appear to come from a 1777 report that stated that every 25 pounds of ore yielded 8 ounces of silver (640 oz/ton). The record through the first part of the nineteenth century is sketchy. Apaches may have kept control of the region through about 1812. At least three different silver deposits were mentioned at Arivaca. An excellent paper by James Officer, 1991, discussing the Spanish period of mining in Arizona can be found in History of Mining in Arizona, Part II. Additional material can be found in Bancroft’s History of Arizona and New Mexico, as well as his multi-volume treatise on the History of Mexico. Numerous other papers are published on the subject, many of them coming in the past decade as interest in Arizona mining history has gained strength. There are may sidebars associated with the early exploring period of the white man. Included among these are stories of Fred Bruncknow who discovered the original site for the Tombstone mine, was part of the Sonora Exploring group who visited the Arivaca area and wrote of it in 1859 (Mining Magazine, Volume 1, p2, 1859). He, Chas. D. Poston, and engineer Ehrenburg purchased the Arivaca Ranch in 1856, and established their headquarters in Tubac. Most mining, however, did not take place at Arivaca until the Apache problem diminished in the late 1870’s. Renewed interest in the region brought in new capital, though no large deposits were found.

The wonderful stories surrounding Arivaca are too many for this catalog. Important glimpses of them may be found in the historical sketches offered in this and associated sections.

883. Pima. Arivaca. Arivaca Milling, Mining and Commercial Company. Incorporated in Missouri in 1878. Unissued certificate number 53. Unsigned. Uncancelled. Very nice vignette below masthead of large mill complex with several horse drawn carts entering and leaving; top left of three miners underground inspecting rock sample and at top right of two surface miners with ore-car train at mine portal and mill building in background. Black print and border on white paper. Printed by R. P. Studley Co. St Louis. 9 x 12. We could find no reference to this company among our resources. The name strongly suggests the company as organized to operate in the Arivaca district, located in southern Pima County. It is unlikely they operated very long, if at all, since there is no record of their activities. This is one of the oldest districts in the state and we have a number of lots from this locality, which see. Folds, minor foxing at edges. Est. $50-150

884. Pima. Arivaca. Arizona Mining Co.; Inc. in NY, 1863, issued 1864, #316 to Thomas Scott for 300 shares, signed by W. M. B. Hartley, vp and J. B. Randol as sec, witnessed by Wm. D. Hollis. Large detailed vignette of the Heintzelman Mine at top center, one of the great vignettes of all Arizona stock certificates. 25-cent Entry of Goods revenue stamp at left tied by AMC cancellation. Minor folds. Printed by Root, Anthony & Co., New York. Uncancelled. 8.5 x 10”

The Arizona MC bought all the properties of the Sonora Exploring and MC., the first mining company of Americans in Arizona. The Company was owned by “New York Capitalists” according to Sylvester Mowry in his 1864 book Arizona and Sonora, …History and Resources of the Silver Region of North America. The mine is in the region known as “Cerro Colorado”. It is one of several mines in the area worked by Spanish and Mexican miners dating as far back as at least 1751. The Heintzelman, Arivaca, and others are part of a group of mines within about 7 miles of each other that make up the Cerro Colorado region on and near the Arivaca Ranch. It was among the most active of the pre-1800 mining regions in the Arizona-Sonora-New Mexico areas, all owned by Mexico prior to the Gadsden Purchase in 1848. The American period is marked by Sam Heintzelman and Charles Poston’s visit to the area in 1854 and their plans to promote the mines. They and partners formed the Sonora Exploring and Mining Company. They hired Henry Ehrenberg and Fred Brunckow as mining engineer and assayer and proceeded to leave Texas for Tubac on an exploring mission that would take the better part of a year. Much of their effort was taken around the Cerro Colorado area, the Heintzelman and Arivaca in particular. Over the years the mine suffered greatly from Apache attacks. Indeed, the Apache controlled the area for long periods of time over a near 50-year period in which few white men dared entry. They killed miners, explorers, and even ran off famous mining engineer Raphael Pumpelly and his men. It was a brutal time in western expansion history, not completely over until the death of Cochise and capture of Geronimo in the 1870’s. Written record of the mining history is scant and summarized below.

One of the first Americans to write about the mine was W. H. Emory in his Notes of a Military Reconnaissance from Fort Leavenworth in Missouri to San Diego, California, as part of his assignment to look for a southern transcontinental railroad route from 1846-7, published in 1848. Famous frontiersman Kit Carson was one of the guides. During his travel along the Gila, he was often asked about the Apache seen lining the distant ridges on horseback “I would not trust one of them” while the Mexicans said “We hate and will kill them all.” Of the Cerro Colorado area, Emory said “We learned that those who worked them made their fortunes; but the Apaches did not like their proximity, and one day turned out and destroyed the mining town, driving off the inhabitants.” He noted that all that was left at the time were “remains of some twenty or thirty adobe houses, and ten or fifteen shafts sinking into the earth.”

By the late 1850’s, conditions were not much better when John Bartlett performed the US Boundary survey from 1850-1853. Some of the party then had heard rumors of rich buried treasure at or near Cerro Colorado abandoned during one of the many deathly Apache raids. &#x20Several men took their discharge here for the purpose of clearing out the shaft and getting the buried treasure. After several weeks labor, they reached the bottom, and even reached some feet below the surface. Veins of gold were found, but not sufficient to pay the cost…the spot was abandoned” &#x20The Mexicans who had formerly resided here assured me that the existence of silver was known to many at the time, but being in the very heart of the Apache country could not be worked.”

When Sylvester Mowry wrote in 1864 about his trip there, ostensibly as part of the Sonora Exploring and Mining party in 1859-60, he cited that the Arizona Mining Company had bought the property. (Mowry was running a competitive exploration venture in the late 1850’s and early 1860’s to that of Heintzelman, and their paths often crossed in the search for investors.) Typical of the early mines in the region, it was fort-like. Of his visit in 1860 he wrote: “I was surprised on our arrival to the mine…to see the appearance of a Mexican village, built around the nucleus of a fort…The hacienda of the Cerro Colorado presented probably the most striking scene of life and energy in the Territory. About 120 peons were in the employ of the Company, the works were in active operation; vast piles of ore were cast up daily from the bowels of the earth…” But in 1863, it was desolate and deserted. “The adobe houses were fast falling to ruin…the rich piles of ore lying in front of the shafts had been sacked and robbed by marauding Mexicans, nothing was to be seen except wreck and ruin…” (The term peon as used by Mowry had a more specific meaning than it does today. Then, a peon, was a form of slavery as practiced by Mexicans. Emory discussed the practice briefly, but only mentioned that it was a different form of involuntary servitude than that practiced in America.) Poston and Mowry climbed down the ladders into the mine, but it was too full of water to reach any of the working levels. The 100 foot deep shaft had 70 feet of water in it. The Mexicans had been carting the ore off to Saric in Sonora, and the wagon wheel tracks were still evident. J. Ross Brown, who wrote Adventures in Apache Country quotes Mowry word for word about the Heintzelman because he never went there, probably because of the Apache trouble and imminent danger of death.

The Sonora Exploring and Mining Co. (SEMC) was begun in 1854 as an investment in mines in southern Arizona by Sam Heintzelman, Chas. Poston, William Wrightson and mining engineer Herman Ehrenberg. Heintzelman was a military man who had been involved with the exploration of the territory for numerous years. They made as their camp the crossing of the Colorado River at Fort Yuma, which they later laid out as Colorado City (Yuma). It was not until 1856 that their idea of exploring for precious metals actually got off the ground while Heintzelman was stationed across the Ohio River from Cincinnati. Poston and Heintzelman then formalized the idea they had concocted while at Fort Yuma in 1854. Hamilton, in Resources of Arizona published in 1884, stated that the Arizona Mining Company was formed by Poston and Heintzelman in 1855 at the same time as the Sonora Exploring and Mining Company. The Arizona Mining Co. appears to have been owned by the same people, but may have been technically under the control of the SEMC. When Raphael Pumpelly went to the mines in the early 1860’s with Poston and others, they were run off by the Apaches, afraid for their lives. Indeed, Poston’s brother, William Wrightson, and others were killed by the Apaches while surveying on one of their mining ventures in 1861. The 1855 date of formation of the company is backed up in Heintzelman’s biography Samuel Peter Heintzelman and the Sonora Exploring and Mining Co. written by North in 1980. North related that Heintzelman was the one selling the SEMC stock in Cincinnati while he was stationed there. He sold to wealthy Cincinnati merchants, Brown Bros. & Co. of London, Samuel Colt (firearms manufacturer) and others.

In August of 1856 the group reached Tucson, then moved south to Tubac, where Company headquarters were established in an old Spanish presidio. From there, Heintzelman, Poston, Ehrenberg, Brunckow, Wrightson and others carried out their explorations mostly under the name Sonora Exploring and Mining Co., but also as the Arizona Mining Co., which was probably a wholly owned subsidiary, though this was not a common practice at the time. The Company bought the Arivaca Ranch, which contained most or all of the mines that were known to be worked historically by the Spanish and Mexicans in the 1700’s and early 1800’s before the Apache wars of the early and mid nineteenth century. (Please see the section on Arivaca in this catalog for more information on the early period.) By February 1, 1857, Fred Brunckow had reported the “discovery of a vein of silver ore located about one mile from the summit of the southeastern side of the Cerro Colorado. He named the vein the Heintzelman Mine,” wrote North. Records of just which company controlled which mines seems obfuscated in the historical record. However the SEMC had complete control. The AMC was an unused securities vehicle, idle until it’s needed use in 1863-4 as discussed later. In 1860, the company reported that they had sold over $45,000 in metals produced from the mine, and had on hand another $26,000 ready for shipment. Heintzelman, the president, had reported in an 1858 letter “that all the ore smelted to that date yielded $928 per ton.”

In 1861, renowned mining geologist Raphael Pumpelly and others visited the mine. He built two furnaces, upgraded mining methods, and began production in a more sophisticated manner. He later wrote that the veins were thin and the mining “mere Prospecting,” but processing even small amounts of ore was necessary to meet expenses. He and other workers shipped a wagon load of ore to the Salero. As they approached, they were “waylaid and massacred by the Apaches.” Pumpelly held the rest of the crew together, smelted the ore, but within a few weeks, the Apaches massacred the crew at the Heintzelman, killing John Poston’s brother and others. That was the end of an era at the Heintzelman. (Lenon in Mining History of Arizona, vIII). The Arizona Mining Company seems to have remained dormant from 1855 to 1863. It was probably an unused corporate shell set up by the Poston-Heintzelman group for possible later use as the mines on the Arivaca Ranch were developed. Regardless, it was revived and incorporated in New York by Samuel Colt and his associated investors in 1863.

Heintzelman and Poston had tired of the search for ores on their properties and agreed to sell the holdings of the Sonora Exploring and Mining Co. to Sam Colt and friends. On August 13, 1863, the two companies executed a document transferring the title in the Arivaca Ranch, the mines and property to the Arizona Mining Co. for $500,000, which included current shareholders retaining stock in the new company. Meanwhile, the lease for the mining properties, etc., was held by a different party, and that lease was also transferred to the AMC for a reported $2.5 million, probably in stock. The ores processed and metals sold as reported to shareholders in the early 1860’s do not validate such an exorbitant price for the property and lease, thus my suspicion that the entire deal was for stock and a minimal amount of cash. Colt sent M. O. Davidson, a mining engineer, to run the Heintzelman. (Please see the Enriquita Gold Co. in this section)

The company continued through 1870, though little is written of its efforts or of the metals mined, except by Browne. By 1868, the Heintzelman became known as the Colorado Mine (short for Cerro Colorado). J. Ross Browne, in Mineral Resources of the States and Territories West of the Rocky Mountains, 1868, reported that the north-south striking lode was generally a 22-inch wide vein, exposed for 2200 feet along strike as it cut a porphyritic country rock. It was reported to shareholders as containing six per cent silver on the average with copper and some gold, which equated about $120 per ton then. Noted mining engineer Guido Kustel, an expert on the Comstock silver ores, had just published a book on processing of silver ores in 1863 when he was asked to investigate the ores of the Heintzelman and others at Cerro Colorado (Arivaca Ranch). His first comment cited by Browne was: “The characteristic feature of this mine is the rich ore that shows everywhere.” &#x20The best mines in Santa Rita are those lately discovered, of which no outcropping was to be seen. This was also the case with the Heintzelman lode.” Thus we know that Ehrenberg, Brunckow, and others before the Colt group did not possess the skills of exploration geologists, and it wasn’t until the Colt group took control that they began organized exploration (visualize the California gold rush, where miles of quartz veins were closely investigated after 1850, but it took 2 years, 1848-1850, until the miners realized there were valuable lode deposits.) Kustel also reported that the Heintzelman shaft was about 100 feet deep, and supplied sufficient water for 100 men and the reduction works.

Poston again became involved with the Company in 1870. He tried in vain, apparently, to lure European investors to the AMC properties. The Company died a quiet death shortly afterward.

Thomas Scott was an influential eastern railroad man. He rose to the Vice presidency of the Pennsylvania Railroad Co., gaining valuable experience that would catapult him into management of transportation for Union forces and interests during the Civil War. In 1871 he became president of the Union Pacific Railroad, then became president of the Pennsylvania Railroad, until he died in 1881. Scott did not sign this certificate; rather his estate signed it years later after it apparently had no value. Hartley was a director of the Sonora Exploring & Mining Co. when Sam Colt was president. This is one of the top Arizona mining certificates. Please see Lot 1155 as well. Est. $1,000-2,000

885. Pima. Arivaca. Arizona Land and Mining Company. Incorporated in Rhode Island in 1859. Certificate number 279 issued to Nancy K. Bishop in 1881 for 50 shares. Signed by President John N. Francis, Treasurer Amos M. Haines and Secretary John R. Bartlett. Printed by Hatch & Co., NY. Vignette upper right of explorers and Indians camped in desert. Uncancelled. Black border and print on white paper. 7 x 10. Active at Arivaca and other districts. This is a significant autograph and historical piece. This was one of the earliest companies organized to operate in Arizona. The company owned a large tract of land, including the old silver mine at San Xavier that had been worked by the Jesuits. This mine was reported to be very rich and other equally rich veins were said to be found on the property as well. The company was owned, in part, by Samuel Colt and Sylvester Mowry. Mowry also purchased the Patagonia mine, later renamed the Mowry. Both Colt and Mowry were major shareholders in the Sopori Land and Mining Company that had property nearby (Mowry, 1864, p. 81.) John R. Bartlett was the U.S. Boundary Commissioner from Rhode Island June 1850 to January 1853. Bartlett had worked with Emory, and his two volume narrative Exploration and Incidents in Texas, New Mexico, California, Sonora and Chihuahua, 1850-1853 on the boundary survey was published, cited within this catalog numerous times. Bartlett and crew, including Emory, had a difficult time defining the Mexico border because of conflict with Mexico over the starting point of the survey. James Gadsden in 1853 went to Mexico to solve this problem, which resulted in the Gadsden Purchase, paving the way for a Pacific Railroad at the same time, according to Dan Thrapp in his Encyclopedia of Western Biography (1988). The border controversy is also well discussed in Bancroft’s History of Arizona and New Mexico, 1889. John Francis was a respected politician, businessman and Civil War veteran from Providence, Rhode Island. He was a delegate to the Democratic National Convention in 1860, and was a recruiting agent for RI in the Civil War before joining in the artillery division, mustered in at North Carolina in 1864. Bartlett’s books are sold in the lot below.[ref: various internet sites] Est. $500-1500

886. Pima. Arivaca. Personal Narrative of Explorations and Incidents in Texas, New Mexico, California, Sonora and Chihuahua, 1850-1853. Copyright 1965. Two Hardbound Volumes. Volume one has 506 pages and volume two has 624 pages. By John Russell Bartlett. These volumes cover the explorations and incidents connected with the United States and Mexican Boundary Commission, during the years 1850-1853. John Russell Bartlett was the United States Commissioner during that period. The two volumes have maps and illustrations. Brown covers with gold print. White pages with black print. Volume one has a smudge on some of the bottom pages. Like new condition. 6 1/4 X 9 1/4”. See above lot for more on Bartlett. Est. $50-150

887. Pima. Arivaca. Cerro-Colorado Mill & Mining Co., incorporated in California 1876, issued 1876 to John P. Arey for 200 shares, signed by T. M. McEntee as president and E. P. Voisard as secretary. Vignette of the Heintzelman mine (Cerro Colorado) at top center, liberty at left. No printer shown. “Cerro Colorado Mining District, Arizona Territory”. Uncancelled. Endorsed by Arey on reverse. 5 x 9”, black on crème. This certificate is a further and later attempt to mine the famous Heintzelman mine (Please see Arizona Mining Co. for the story of the mine.) Voisard was a well known mine owner and promoter in Arizona. McEntee also appears to be an Arizonan since neither is listed in the Langley’s San Francisco Directory for 1875. By 1883 there were less than 100 of people left at Arivaca, according to the McKenney’s 1883-4 Directory, with a hotel, 2 saloons and a brewery, one grocery store, a general merchandise store, blacksmith and butcher. In an article in the Arizona Citizen from July 21, 1877 we have the following information on this company: “Last year, …a young man (Voisard) came into our district as the Secretary of the Cerro Colorado Mining Co., which company, by the way, after an attempt to bring in a mill, dissolved, and (he) soon began operations on his own account.” This certificate is an important document as part of the ongoing exploration efforts at the Heintzelman. Rare. Est. $200-400

888. Pima. Arivaca. Van Nostrand Camp. Holographic check dated May 20, 1877 from the Silver Eagle Camp, Arivaca, Pima Co. A.T. signed by Capt. Voisard written for $20. 3.5 x 3.5”. Voisard had left the Cerro Colorado after the dissolving of the Cerro Colorado M&MC in 1876-7. He spent time in the Van Nostrand mining camp in the Arivaca district, locating a number of mines, including the Ortiga (also spelled Ortega) and Van Nostrand mines. Voisard and others had been working in the area looking for a “lost” Mexican mine. About May 15, 1877, just days before this note was written, an article in the Arizona Citizen noted that Voisard and compadres had found the lost Mexican silver mine and perfected the location. Voisard was then reported to have left for San Francisco to try to incorporate the mines at Van Nostrand with financial help. By July, the Citizen noted that the district needed a smelter, noting also that a new house was built. In December, the Weekly Star noted that Voisard had returned from San Francisco trying “to induce capitalists in erecting works for reducing ores in the Oro Blanco and Arivaca mining districts.” [I don’t know if Voisard ever was successful in the financing venture – fh] This is a very rare check from a truly remote location in Arizona Territory that still stands as one of the most important historical mining districts in the Territory. Est. $100-200

889. Pima. Arivaca. Enriguetta Gold Company of Arizona. Incorporated in New York in 1864. Certificate number 11 issued to M. O. Davidson for 200 shares in 1864. Signed by President Geo. J. Forrester and J. B. Randol, Secretary. Datelined New York. 25 cent revenue stamp at left edge. No vignette. Red print on crème paper. Folds with tears and holes at edges. Uncancelled. 7 x 9. M. O. Davidson was in charge of the Enriguetta Gold Company works, which were located southwest of the Cerro Colorado near Arivaca. He had been a supervisor of the Cumberland coal mines in Maryland and a chief engineer of the Havana Railroad in Cuba. He came to Arizona in 1863 to take charge of the Cerro Colorado, also known as “ Sam Colt’s Mine”, bringing with him about 30 men. The Cerro Colorado was part of the Heintzelman mines and they began by clearing the mine of water and obstructions. In 1864 Davidson was appointed as a special agent with the Papago agency with a salary of $100 per year. That same year he became director of the Arizona Mining Company, which operated the Heintzelman mine. Browne (1868, p 445) reports that some expensive machinery had been erected on the Enriguetta, “…several years since, but like that upon the Heintzelman mine it is now idle. These lodes are probably too small to be profitably worked until mining can be conducted at les expense.” Davidson had a telegraph line erected over the 13 mile stretch from the Cerro Colorado to the Enriguetta in about 1864, which was the first telegraph line erected in Arizona, according to John Clark, Surveyor General of Arizona, 1865. See also, discussion of Arivaca and Arizona Mining Company in this section. Est. $600-1000


890. Pima. Arivaca. Guijas Gold Mining Company. Incorporated in Arizona in 1898. Certificate no. 249 issued to Mary E. Lovelace for 250 shares in 1898 at Toledo, Ohio. Black border with vignettes of miner in corners and side centers, vignette of underground mining scene upper left, gold safety print and seal, uncancelled, 8 x 10, VF condition with folds, slight nicks at fold edges. The company name and holdings probably derived from the Las Guijas Creek placer district, in the Arivaca area. Gold placers were worked at Las Guijas in the 1860’s to ‘70s with most of the production prior to 1900. Placer activity died down by about 1915. A 9.5 ounce gold nugget was reported to be found in 1893. [Ref: Bull 168, Ariz Bu of Geology, 1961, p.78] Est. $50-150

891. Pima. Arivaca. Liberty Cons. Mining & Transportation Co. Incorporated in Arizona 1905. Issued to William F. Dulls for 19 shares, cert #2341, in 1906. Signed by Joseph Weld president and Robert Gladding secretary. Vignette of several miners working underground. Orange border, seal and safety print. Uncancelled. Printer - Goes. 8 x 11. This company was not listed in the Copper Handbooks. The Liberty mine and the town of Liberty were located in Pima County. There were several companies with Liberty in the title that had operations in around the Liberty area. We believe that this was the case for this company. Very fine. Est. $25-75

892. Pima. Arivaca. Madera Mining Company. Incorporated in Arizona in 1907. Certificate no. 1327 issued to Ed Fogarty in 1913 for 200 shares in 1913. Signed by H. E. Brandt, president and secretary, name illegible. Gold border and seal, three vignettes, upper left and right underground mining scenes, and upper center landscape of mountains, uncancelled, 9 x 10, Fine condition, with heavy folds, repaired on back with scotch tape. Company held 16 claims in the Arivaca district, Santa Rita mountains, south of Tucson. Property contains a 5 ft vein with gold and silver-bearing bornite and chalcopyrite, developed by a 500 ft. crosscut tunnel. Property was being worked in 1913, however in 1916 property was idle and machinery removed. (1912CH, p.544, 1916CH, p.719). Est. $25-50

893. Pima. Arivaca. New Deal Gold Mining and Milling Co.. Incorporated in Arizona. No date. Certificate no. 1763 issued to Jacob Horn for 40 shares in 1935. Signed by W. F. Crowley, president, and W. Frank Crowley, secretary. Printed by Goes. Black border with gold safety print and seal, uncancelled, 6 x 10. We could find no reference to this company among our resources. The company obviously took its name from Roosevelt’s “New Deal” that described the political, social and economic policies of his administration from 1933 to 1945. District from Garbani 2001. VF condition with folds. Est. $25-50

Pima. Arivaca. Please see Pima, Cerro Colorado and Santa Cruz, Patagonia for related material.


894. Pima. Arivaca. Salero Mining & Manufacturing Company. Incorporated in 1875 in Ohio. Certificate number 189, issued to Jas. C. Truman for 1000 shares in 1875. Signed by President Henry Wells and Secretary Robt. R. Rhodes. Printed by John H. Duychinck, NY. Uncancelled. Vignette top center of a stagecoach in rugged terrain in Sonoran desert and at left portrait of Henry Wells, of Wells-Fargo & Co. and the American Express Co., the first president of the Salero M&MCO. &#x20Location of Mines Pima County, Arizona Terr.” Green border with black print on white paper. 7 x 11. The Salero Mining Company was one of the earliest mining companies organized to exploit Arizona’s mineral wealth. The company was organized by William Wrightson of the Cincinnati Enquirer, but such notables as H. C. Grosvenor, an English mining engineer, Gilbert Hopkins, mineralogist and engineer, Raphael Pumpelly, geologist, engineer, author and later professor at Harvard, were associated with the company. It was headquartered in Tubac from 1858 to 1861 (Hinton, 1878, p. 197).

The Salero mine was worked by the Spanish and Mexicans before 1800, as one of the first mines on record in Arizona. It was located on the Arivaca Ranch, which contained a number of good silver mines worked since at least 1750. While production was noted throughout the historical record, there are no definitive statistics available on the amounts of silver taken from the Salero or other Arivaca mines near Tubac and Santa Rita. An excellent discussion of the early mining period is given in both Bancroft’s History of Arizona (1889) and by James Officer in History of Mining in Arizona Volume II and John Lacy in Volume I.

According to North, in her biography of Sam Heintzelman published in 1980, the (re)discovery of the Salero by Herman Christain Ehrenberg, Frederick Brunckow, Charles Schuchard and C. D. Poston was announced on January 1, 1857. This group also had a controlling interest in the Heintzelman mine, on which their attention was focused. Raphael Pumpelly was brought in to try to put the Salero on a paying basis. Pumpelly reported in 1861 (Browne, 1868, p. 446) that the Salero possessed “…a shaft 69 ft deep, admirably equipped, and timbered in a very substantial manner.” Unfortunately, at that time this portion of Arizona was the domain of the Apache Indians, who murdered whites working and living in the area, stole their cattle and destroyed most anything that could be destroyed. Such an incident was the demise of operations at these two mines. A wagonload of ore being delivered from the Heintzelman mine to the Salero mine, in payment for an intracompany debt, was ambushed by Apaches just outside the camp. In addition to the two teamsters, Wrightson, Hopkins and Grosvenor were among those murdered in this attack. ”With the entire countryside under siege, the Salero crew, under the direction of Pumpelly, picked up the ore and smelted it, working day and night to do so, behind armed guards, and delivered the silver ingots to the company headquarters in Tubac. The general unrest continued and within a few weeks, the entire crew at the Heintzelman Mine (including Poston’s brother John) was murdered by Mexican bandits who had come up, in the words of Pumpelly, “for the purpose of inciting the peons…and to rob [the two mines].” Sensing the seriousness of the situation, Poston, Pumpelly and others, escaped to California through the Sonoran desert.”(Lenon, in: Canty, 1999, Vol III, p 56) This activity continued into the 1870’s and severely hampered development of the mineral wealth there. By the mid 1870’s, these activities of the Apaches were brought under control, allowing renewed activity at those mines discovered a decade or two earlier.

In 1864 J. Ross Browne wrote of his trip to the Salero and other mines in Harper’s Weekly, which was republished by Sylvester Mowry in 1864 as part of his Arizona and Sonora book. No work was being done on the mine at the time, and Browne noted the work of a number of mining engineers who had all opined favorably about the property, but the Apache problem was too severe for continued mining and exploration. Schrader, in Mineral Deposits of the Santa Rita and Patagonia Mountains, 1915, reported that the company “retired in 1865.” In the early 1870’s, an English corporation relocated the mine but had to vacate the location because of the new 1872 mining laws, disallowing foreign locators. Another group relocated the mine, mined and sold $10,000 worth of ore from the 60-foot level, and left a reported 1500 tons on the dump for processing. It appears that it was at this time that the Henry Wells group got involved, possibly leasing the mine from Peterson & Clark.

About 1875 the Salero Mining Company probably was reorganized as the Salero Mining and Manufacturing Company, under the direction of Henry Wells. Wells had just stepped down as president of the American Express Company and earlier was one of the founders of the Wells Fargo Company. Wells was one of many New York financiers intrigued by the western mines. The Arizona mines represented an excellent opportunity since their exploration and development had been curtailed by the Apache until the mid 1870’s.

The new company’s activity at the mine is not well documented. Raymond, in 1876, reported the Salero and others, had “…been worked to some extent and were well spoken of…” The mine became known as the Darwin mine and later as the Constitution mine. About 1898 Peterson & Clark drove a 300 foot shaft in exploration for new ore, and they sold the mine to a new group known as the Salero Mines, Co., with involvement by William Phipps Blake, one of the country’s leading mining engineers, then living in Tucson. Work, and limited production, continued through at least 1920.

This is one of the most important autographed pieces from Arizona. It is a rare case of one of the great eastern financiers involved with a western mine, and may exhibit why there was not more of this activity, since the company was basically worthless. It is extremely rare. Est. $3000-6000

895. Pima. Arivaca. Salero Mining & Manufacturing Company. Incorporated in 1875 in Ohio. Unissued certificate number 2211. Printed by John H. Duychinck, NY. Vignette top center of a stagecoach in rugged terrain and at left portrait of Henry Wells, of Wells-Fargo, the first president of the Salero M&MCO. &#x20Location of Mines Pima County, Arizona Terr.” Green border with black print on white paper. 7 x 11. Please see above lot for description. Est. $50-100

896. Pima. Arivaca. Samuel Peter Heintzelman and the Sonora Exploring & Mining Company. By Diane M. T. North. 248 pages. Copyright 1980. This book covers the tells about Heintzelman and his association with the Sonora Exploring & Mining Company. The book includes Heintzelman’s journal of his activities in the Arizona Territory. At the end of the book there is a summary on Heintzelman’s life which includes encounters with the Indians. There are a few drawings including one of the Heintzelman mine. Lots of references are included. Brown cover with white and black printing. A picture of Heintzelman is also on the cover. The book pages are white with black print. Cover has wear marks. Size 5 1/2 X 8 1/2”. Good Condition. Est. $15-30

Pima. Aztec. Please see Santa Cruz County, Tyndall district also.

897. Pima. Aztec. Aztec Gold & Silver Mining Co. Incorporated in California in 1877. Certificate number 297 issued to Jno. R. Wallace, trustee for 100 shares in 1877. Signed by President C. S. Benedict and Secretary C. A. Poage. Printed by Britton, Rey, SF. Vignette at left margin of partially nude woman with bow and quiver of arrows. Uncancelled. Black border and print on white paper. Datelined San Francisco. &#x201ztec Dist. Arizona Territory.” 4 x 9. This company probably had mines in the Aztec or Tyndall district near Patagonia. The district produced a considerable amount of silver as well as lead, copper and gold. Est. $200-500

898. Pima. Aztec. Aztec Syndicate of Arizona. Incorporated in Pennsylvania in 1878. Certificate number 1 issued to Winthrop Smith for 100 shares in 1878. Signed by President J. W. Jones and Treasurer Chas. F. Bains. Printed by Breuker & Kessler, Phila. Vignette top center of 4 miners working underground. Uncancelled. Black border and print on white paper. Datelined Philadelphia. 7 x 10. This company operated in the Aztec or Tyndall district. Hinton (1878, pp. 209-214) reports the company’s working headquarters was at Toltec camp and that they owned the Aztec, Inca and Iturbide mines. &#x20The Aztec district contains a large number of mines located by the Syndicate and by private prospectors.” He reports the Syndicate also owned the Jefferson, Georgia, San Ignacio, and Rosario in the Tyndall District. The company also had a mill-site and reduction works located on Sonoita Creek about 5-1/2 miles from Toltec camp. Lenon (in Canty, 1999, p. 58) indicates the Aztec was a hard rock operation that continued for a “considerable period”. They evidently failed, however, before the coming of the railroad in the 1880’s. Supposedly their individual deposits were of very good grade but not continuous along the formation. Also, the width of the veins varied greatly with depth. Possibly that by the time the rails were constructed in the district, the good ground was under such diverse ownership that it was impossible to develop prospects properly. Est. $200-500

899. Pima. Aztec (Tyndall). Montezuma Mine & Milling Co. of Arizona. Incorporated in New Jersey in 1881, issued 1881 to E. W. Matthews for 14,990 shares (cert 23) signed by Ephiram Young as president and E. Wallace Matthews as secretary. Uncancelled. Silver underprint, black print and border. 9.5 x 13”, folds, some crinkling. Datelined Camden, NJ. Printed by Leonhardt & Sons, Phila. The name of this company is very common and represents a challenge in historical research. The Montezuma Mining &Milling Co. held two patented claims, one with 5 mines and the other for milling purposes. The mines were discovered by the Spanish prior to 1800 and worked intermittently until the time of issuance of this certificate because of severe Apache trouble. The mine is located near the famous Salero Mine, and was worked by the Aztec Mining Co. of New York in 1860. In 1880 the properties were patented. Burchard noted that it was still a prospect at that time (1880). The patent papers show an old fort at the eastern edge of the claim, typical of the old Spanish mines in this area. Though a new company was incorporated, no significant new work was done on the property until about 1900. [ref: Schrader, Burchard 1881] Rare. Est. $250-500

900. Pima. Aztec. Saint Louis G. & S. Mining Co. Inc. in CA, 1878. Certificate number 88 issued to Jno. D. Graham, trustee in 1878 for 10 shares. Signed by President M. Haynes and Secretary C. Cranz. &#x201ztec District Arizona Territory.” Vignette in masthead of several miners working underground. Printed by Britton, Rey & Co., SF. Uncancelled. Folds. Black border and print on white paper. 4 x 9. This company’s mine, located near Greaterville in1874, produced a little ore in the early days, but in 1886 was developed by a 75-ft shaft and drifts. At that time, its ore yielded 40% lead, 75 ounces silver and 12 ounces gold to the ton and was shipped to El Paso for smelting. This mine continued to produce at least until WWI. Est. $200-500

Pima. Aztec. Please see Santa Cruz County, Tyndall district also.

901. Pima. Baboquivari. Arizona Gold King Mining Co. Incorporated in Arizona. Issued to Umberto Bittistesso for 2500 shares, cert #21, in 1920. Signed by T. Morris secretary and Fred Sandtney president. Vignette of three mills. Green border and seal. Uncancelled. Printer - Goes. 8 x 11. There is a Gold King mine located in Pima County within the Baboquivari district. (Index of Mining Prop, Pima County, 1974). Extremely fine. Est. $25-75

902. Pima. Baboquivari. Arizona Mining Co. Incorporated in New Mexico in 1887, issued 1888 to James S. Reid for 516 shares, signed by M. A. Bowley as president and Hugh Furguson as secretary, datelined St. Louis, MO. Black on white. No vignette. Gold seal. Printer obscured by seal. 7 x 11”, Uncancelled. This famous company name appears to have been used to promote a property other than the Heintzelman, which was where the name had its historical roots. Stanton Kieth reported in his Index of Mining Properties in Pima County that a company by this name had properties at Baboquivari District in the Baboquivari Mountains, significantly west of Arivaca. Production is unknown. Est. $150-300

903. Pima. Baboquivari. Papago Chief Consolidated Mining Company. Incorporated in Iowa in 1878. Certificate number 1090, issued to W. T. Witherell for 100 shares in 1880. Signed by president W. W. Merritt and secretary R. M. Roberts. Printed by Western R. N. Engraving Co. Chicago. Vignette on left shows two miners on surface lowering buckets to three miners at the bottom, which are working. Vignette on the right shows three miners working at the bottom of a shaft, one calling for a bucket to be raised. The vignette in the center shows an Indian brave looking over a town. Uncancelled. Folds. Blace border on white paper with black print. Silver leaf underprint including a large RN facsimile with “shares $20 each.” Size 8 1/2 X 11”. Hamilton (1884, p. 231) reports the property is some three miles north of the Quijotoas, and has produced ore worth $1,000 per ton. The ledge is large, and the ore free milling. The property is being fully developed. Balch (1882, p. 1126) reports the property consists of three mining claims totaling 50 acres. The ore is an argentiferous (silver bearing) galena. Assays were $96 to $124 per ton. The length of the main lode which the company depends for its supply of ore is 500 feet, with an average vein width of twenty-four inches. Yield, net, to April 1, 1882, 177 1/2 tons of ore; value, $8,000. Very attractive and extremely rare. Est. $250-500

904. Pima. Brownell. United Mining Co. Lot of 3 different pcs. Incorporated in Maine 1905. One has a blue border, cert #A573, for 25 shares. Second has a green border, cert #C1257, for 100 shares. The third has a purple border, cert #B906, for 250 shares. All have the same vignette of miners working underground. All uncancelled. Two are signed by John Thompson president and John Kinson asst treasurer. The other is signed by Albert Arneau president and James J. Nolan treasurer. This company reported having property in Pima County, Arizona, Leadville, Colorado, Saltese, Montana, Bland, New Mexico, Sinaloa, Mexico and Halifax, Nova Scotia. This may have sounded impressive to the unwitting investor, but the company was just a promotion of Albert Freeman and considered a “bad egg” by 1910 (Copper Handbook, 1908, p.1360-61; Copper Handbook, 1910). All very fine. Est. $50-100

905. Pima. Brownell. United Mining Co. Certificate of Participation in the United Mining Co, cert #225. This is a receipt for $6.50 from the American Financial Agency Co dated 1909. See lot above for the story. Tears along fold creases. Fine. Est. $20-40

906. Pima. Cababi. Cababi Mining Company. Company Incorporated in Arizona in 1908. Certificate no. 1239 issued to Silvester E. Adkins for 400 shares in 1912. Signed by Chas. H. Wilson, president and W.H. Kershner, secretary. Black border with gold safety print and seal, three vignettes, upper left and right of placer miners, and double sluice box with dam upper center, uncancelled, 8 x 11, Excellent condition with folds. Company held 44 claims, including the Picacho claim along with 2 mill sites in the Cababi mountains about 69 miles southwest of Tucson. The Picacho claim is developed by 1,180 ft. of workings, including an antiqua which was reopened in 1860 by Francisco Padrea. This mine was a small producer of gold and silver-bearing ores with mostly copper and silver. Thirty miners were employed on the property in 1912. The property had 2,240 tons of ore on the dumps, and 10,000 tons of high-grade ore blocked out in 1913. [Ref: 1912CH p.181] Est. $25-75

907. Pima. Cababi. Cababi Mining Company Letterhead. Handwritten letter, penned in ink on Cababi Mining Co letterhead, from S.G. McWade, general manager to Prof. Chas. F. Willis, Tucson offering to help Willis in his publication on Arizona mining. Excellent condition. c1908. Est. $20-40

908. Pima. Cababi. Grand Central Mining and Mining Company. Incorporated in Arizona in 1907. Certificate no. 330 issued to F.L. Browne for 500 shares in 1907 at Kansas City, Kansas. Signed by Henry Stevens, vice president and Alex Findlay, secretary. Gold border, with gold safety print, three vignettes, upper left and right of underground miners, upper center of landscape view of mountains, uncancelled, 8 x 11, Very fine condition with folds. We found no references for this company. Garbani places the company in the Cababi district. Est. $25-50

909. Pima. Cerro Colorado. Arizona Gold and Silver Mining Company. Incorporated in New York in 1879. Certificate number 40 issued to E. A. Woolston in 1880 for 100 shares. Signed by President Robert J. Parvick (?) and Secretary S. S. Draprof. Printed by Thitchener & Glastaeter, NY. No vignette. Uncancelled. Black border and print on white paper. 8 x 10. We are unsure if this company is related to the one above. This one may be a reorganization of the other, but we are unable to determine that with confidence. Balch (1882) lists an Arizona Gold and Silver Mining Co. that was incorporated in New York in May of 1879 with mines in Mohave Co, AZ. &#x20The ore is both auriferous and argentiferous, assaying $67.60 per ton.” He could be referring to this company, assuming he got the month of incorporation wrong. If so, it is unlikely this is a reorganization of the company above, whose properties were in the Cerro Colorado District, located in Pima County. Burchard (1883) also mentions an Arizona Mine located in Mohave County in the Aubrey (Aubry) district. He also mentions an Arizona Mine in Pima County, but located near Covered Wells, not near Cerro Colorado. Probably related to the Arivaca area. Est. $200-500

910. Pima. Cerro Colorado. Arizona Gold and Silver Mining Company. Inc. in IN, 1878. Certificate number 2? issued to J. B. Scott in 1878 for 50 shares. Signed by President Conrad Baker (?) and Secretary John R. Leake. Printed by Braden & Burford, Indianapolis. Vignette lower left corner of three miners underground inspecting ore sample. Datelined Indianapolis. &#x201Crro Colorado Di…Arizona Terr…”(remainder of these two lines is cut off). Uncancelled. Right edge of certificate is cut off and missing. Black border and print on vanilla paper. 4 x 8. See discussion above of possible location of this company’s properties. Probably related to the Arivaca area. Est. $200-500

911. Pima. Champarado Canyon. Champarado CMC Prospectus, 1917. Frank Heflebower, president, and H.E. Brown, secretary. The first part talks about the rich mining of Arizona, and continues to talk about Champarado Copper Mine, consisting of 6 claims, spreading over 120 acres. Openings made at varying depths for extracting ore showing a net value of $30 per ton. Vf, folds. 9” x 4”. Est. $50-150

912. Pima. Comobabi. Papago Copper Company. Inc. in AZ. No date. #5 issued to H.F. Reese for 800 shares in 1906. Signed by H.C. Abbott, pres., and E.S. Garrett, sec. Gold border and seal, with gold safety print, three vignettes, underground mining scene upper left and right, landscape of mountain scene upper center, green backing, uncancelled, 8 x 11, Very fine condition with folds, minor chips, two hole punch right edge. Company held a copper property of 50 claims in the Comobabi Mountains 65 miles southwest of Tucson. Property had about 1,000 ft. of workings with reported mineralization of azurite, malachite and chalcopyrite. Company reported dead in 1910. [Ref: 1908CH, p.1101, 1910CH, p.1381] Est. $25-50

913. Pima. Coyote. Guaranty Mines Co.. Incorporated in Arizona. No date. Certificate no. 30 issued to Oscar T. Richey for 1,000 shares in 1927. Signed by C.C. Jacome, president, and G.S. Marzo, secretary. Black border gold safety print, vignette of bald eagle upper left, uncancelled, 8 x 11, VF condition with folds and some creases. Company held the Allison and Bonanza claim groups in the Coyote mountain district. Prospect was being developed in 1928 using a 2 drill compresor. In 1928 it was reported that the property had been leased by Inglis M. Uppercu for $200,000. Carlos C. Jacome, president and signatory to the certificate was a prominent Tucson businessman and well known merchant having built up Jacome’s Department Store. [Ref: 1931CH, p.329, Tucson Citizen, Dec 9 and 12, 1932] Est. $25-50

914. Pima. Empire. Total Wreck Mining and Milling Co. Incorporated in New York in 1881. Issued to John R. Vail in 1882 for 200 shares. Signed by J. M. Requa, President and John McMillan, Secretary. Printed by L. H. Biglow & Co., NY. Vignette of four men mining at surface with rugged mountains in background. Uncancelled. White paper with black border and print. 7 x 10. The first location on the Richmond Lode in the Empire Mountains was made in 1879 by John Dillon. The following year, the claim was relocated by Vail and Harvey and renamed the Total Wreck. This bonanza silver deposit was extensively worked in 1880, but operations were delayed the following year pending the outcome of a lawsuit to determine title to the claim. Burchard reported in 1882 “the Total Wreck has proved itself to be one fabulously rich. There are over 50,000 tons of ore in sight, showing a value of nearly $4,000,000. At the present writing its 20 stamp mill is about ready to turn the ore into bullion.”(p306-307) Title was granted to N. R. Vail and the Empire Mining and Smelting Co. was organized to equip the mine (Tenney, p 246, 267-268). The Vail concerns owned the majority of the Total Wreck stock. A photocopy with this certificate of the January 1881 plat map of the Total Wreck claim lists the claimants as W. L. Vail, Jerry Dillon and J. N. Harvey. It isn’t clear how the Total Wreck Mining and Milling Co. is related to all of Vail’s operations, but Vail’s name on this certificate links the company to the mine.

The Mine operated through 1884, producing about $500,000 in silver, or more. Our guess is that the actual production may be significantly higher. We were unable to find specific production records. The mine suffered from water problems, which appear to have been solved in 1883. Burchard gave another lengthy writeup of the mine in 1883. The original owners, Vail and Harvey bought the mine for owed taxes after it closed, reportedly in late 1884 or 1885. Little production was made from the mine during the next 20 years, but it saw a minor production of wulfenite after WWI. It is not known if J. M. Requa was related to the father and son mining engineers, Isaac and Mark Requa, respectively of the Comstock and Robinson districts in Nevada. This is one of the most desirable Arizona certificates, both for the story, site and the minerals collected there. Est. $500-1000

915. Pima. General. Arizona Placer Gold Extraction Co. Prospectus promoting the “E.B. Bennett Placer Machine”, picture on front. With a capacity of 350 cubic yards of placer gravel, the machine was said to have perfected the gold extraction process, “The conveying, washing and scouring… of the gold is all automatically done by the machine.” The automation is enabled by 240 gallons of water per minute passing through the amalgamator, freeing and cleaning gold as it travels. Following the capacity and function description is investment potential, and earnings. 5 page tri-fold brochure. 8” x 5”. Vf, folds. Attribution by Garbani, 2001. Est. $50-150

916. Pima. General. Continental Exploration Company, Incorporated in Arizona in 1905. Certificate no. 453 issued to T.E. Roff for 3,000 shares in 1906 at Denver, Colorado. Signed by K. Whistler, president, and O. P. Lehman, secretary. Black border with gold inner border and safety print, vignettee of bald eagle at top center, uncancelled, 9 x 11, VF condition with folds and slight nicks at folds. We could not find references on this company. Garbani locates the company in Pima county. Est. $25-75

917. Pima. General. El Rey Gold Mines Incorporated. Incorporated in Arizona in 1931. Certificate no. 31 issued to Lina Gerlach for 100 shares in 1931. Signed by Chas. B. Trott, president, and Chas. M. Cassin, secretary. Brown border with gold seal, vignette of underground mining scene top center, uncancelled, 9 x 11, VF condition with folds, slight nicks at folds, staple holes upper left corner. No reference was found for this company. Garbani placed the company in Pima County. Est. $25-50

918. Pima. General. Index of Mining Properties in Pima County, Arizona. By Stanton B. Keith Geologist. Bulletin 189 Reprinted 1984. 156 pages. This book covers the mining districts in Pima County, listing many of the mines, there production, geology and types of operation. There are showing the mining districts as well as the location of many mines. The cover is light yellow with a picture of a mine in the center, and has a light stain in the upper right corner. Very good condition. Size 6 X 9”. Est. $10-25

919. Pima. General. Mining Company Letterheads. Lot of 6 different items. (1) Liberty Silver Mines Company, 1917, information flyer, four pages, folded. Describes the company’s silver, lead, copper, and gold properties at Greaterville, Pima County, Arizona. Mineralized zone reported to measure 800 feet by 3,000 feet, with previous ore shipments with 75 ounces silver, 40% lead, and as high as 12 ounces gold per ton. 9 x 7, folded, VF condition with large punch hole upper left. (2) Arizona Copper Mining Company, carbon copy letter regarding smelter shipments, signed by V. Brunner, secretary and general manager. (3) Arizona Copper Mining Company, Proposition letter seeking share sales, (4) Arizona Copper Mining Company, letter to D.D. Demarest Co. regarding vanner parts. (5) Bonanza Park Mines folded report, 1918, flyer on their mines in the Amole district 10 miles northwest of Tucson. Includes claim map of property. 11 x 17, folded, to 8 1/2 x 3 1/2., (6) Central Butte Mining Company, Douglas, Arizona. 1917, Receipt for stock. All items VF condition with some folds, tears. Est.$50-100

920. Pima. General. Mission Mining Company. Incorporated in Arizona in 1906. Certificate no. 340 issued to C. A. Batson in 1907. Signed by president and secretary, names illegible. Gold border, safety print, and seal, vignettes of underground mining upper left and right, vignette of rolling mountain landscape upper center, uncancelled, 8 x 11, VF condition with folds. No references were found for this company in Arizona. Garibaldi located the company in Pima County. Est. $25-75

921. Pima. General. San Augustine Mining Company, Arizona. Incorporated in “Arizona” January to March, 1862, though dated 186_ on the certificate. Unissued certificate signed by President Samuel J. Jones and Secretary James A. Lucas. Printed by Mesilla Times. Vignette of Indian woman gazing into distance. Uncancelled. Blue border and print on white paper. Datelined Mesilla, Arizona. 4 x 10.5. This certificate had national importance. It is an important and special piece, exemplifying the difficulties of political organizational structure with respect to mining companies during the Civil War. The question “whose side are you on?” became commonplace in the west. Both Confederate and Union supporters wanted, indeed needed the bullion producing regions to generate the much needed capital for survival. This certificate is the only certificate that we know of that was issued from a completely different mind set - from the Confederate Territory of Arizona, as opposed to the Union Territory of Arizona. Mesilla was the capital. All the principals of the company were southern sympathizers. Mowry was even jailed briefly for it. At least nine battles were fought on Arizona soil, according to the massive History of the Civil War series. The story of the Confederate forces in Arizona Territory is much deeper that we can explain in this short piece, and interested readers should seek some of the many papers written on this subject.

The San Augustine owned property that produced lead and silver ore from its mine known as the “Puerta San Augustine” located near the Rio Grande on the western slope of the Organ Mountains ENE of Mesilla and north of the road from Dona Anna to San Augustine Pass. It was originally owned by two Spanish men, but their claim was invalidated at the time of the Gadsden Purchase. The original claim certificate said the claim owners were William Claude Jones, G. W. Southwick and Caleb Sherman. Jones was Sam Jones’ brother.

This company is associated with one of the earliest land scams in the American southwest. At the time, the name “Arizona” was applied “to the southern half of New Mexico Territory, from the Staked Plains of Texas to the Colorado River Bordering California.” In the late 1850’s three promoters, Samuel J. Jones, a native of Virginia, and Lewis S. Owings and Robert P. Kelley were residing in the town of Mesilla on the Rio Grande River near Las Cruces in what is now New Mexico. Jones had been a pro-slavery militant Sheriff in LeCompton, Kansas Territory. They owned, singly or in partnership, a number of businesses in the town and also had interests in mining properties. They realized that the existing population base was too small for them to attain the prosperity they desired, so they concocted a scheme to establish a town site and unabashedly promote it, thus drawing settlers to the area. Kelley had met Sylvester Mowry, a strong Southern sympathizer later jailed in Arizona as a Confederate, in 1858 on a stage ride from Arizona to Missouri, from which he learned of Mowry’s fame and name recognition among eastern investors. Realizing the recognition value of the Mowry name, these promoters chose “Mowry City” as the name for their new town. The town site finally began to establish a population in the Spring of 1860 when gold was discovered at Pinos Altos, about 40 miles to the northwest. However, at the outbreak of the Civil War, the Apaches stepped up their campaign of attacks on all white settlers, miners and travelers throughout the region and this ended the promotion of Mowry. The Jones group chose to use Mesilla as their headquarters for this company because it was the capital of the Confederate Territory of Arizona. The San Augustine was thus held by Confederates. Sam Jones, meanwhile, was president of the Mowry City venture and was the provisional governor of the Territory. Jones was the editor and publisher of the Weekly Arizonan published in Tubac about 1858-9.

The certificate is dated 1862 from a period between January 15th and about April. Mesilla was established as the Confederate capital of Arizona Territory on January 18, 1862, and the Mesilla Times, who printed this certificate, were out of business by spring.

It is the only remaining certificate from the Confederate period and “occupation” of Arizona. Very rare. Extremely rare with signatures, and none are known fully issued. [References: Bancroft; Biertu in Mowry, 1864, p. 83; Finch, A Southwestern Land Scam, 1990, p. 4; claim transfer dated 4/19/1858, copy with certificate; help from Dan Arbuckle on battles in Arizona]. Est. $500-1500

922. Pima/Santa Cruz. General. Geologic Bulletins and map. Lot of 6 pcs. Index of Mining Properties in Santa Cruz; Index of Mining Properties in Pima; Some Geologic Features of the Pima Mining District; Copper Deposits of Part of Helvetia…Pima; Geologic Map of Pima… All very fine, some bent corners, stains. Est. $50-100.

923. Pima. Greaterville. Santa Rita Land and Cattle Company. Incorporated in Colorado in 1890. Certificate number 62 issued to Albert D. S. Bell for 10 shares in 1892. Signed by president William A. Pierce and secretary Edward H. Morm. No printer. No vignette. Uncancelled. Folds. Fancy black border with black print on white paper. Size 6 1/2 X 10” . This is possibly a successor to the Santa Rita Land and Mining Co. of 1882. We were unable to find more information. This company is not listed in any Colorado reference which puts it in Arizona. No other reference to the company or its principles is available. It was named Santa Rita in 1873, and named Greaterville after an early settler. It all began with a dance, some drunks and a fire… the rest is history (Ref: Arizona Place Names, p.190). Est. $150-300


924. Pima. Gunsight. Burro Burro Mining Company. Incorporated in 1881 in New Jersey as the Silver King Gold and Silver Mining Co.; changed the name in 1882 to Burro Burro. Certificate number 224 issued to Sarah L. Pyle for 100 shares in 1883. Signed by President Albert Merritt and Treasurer Chas. Craige. Printed by Theo. Leonhardt & Sons, Phila. Small vignette top center of two miners working underground. Uncancelled. Black border and print on white paper. 8 x 10. Tenney (1927, p. 123) reports that this mine was acquired by a Philadelphia company in 1883 under the management of C. R. Craige. A small smelter was built, but was shut down due to faulty construction after making only one run. It appears unlikely that the company recovered, or if it did, made little production from the property. The Arizona Bureau of Mines reported in 1974 that the Gunsight mine was the only major producer of metal from the district. Est. $200-400

925. Pima. Gunsight. Gunsight Mining Co. Incorporated in New Jersey in 1883. Two certificates: 1) Number 273 issued to Ann J. Boileau for 60 shares of capital stock in 1883. Signed by President J. B. Baker and Treasurer Geo. P. Matthurst. Printed by Theo. Leonhardt & Sons, Phila. Vignette at top right of 6 miners. Uncancelled. White paper, black border and print and yellow safety print. 7 x 11. Certificate 2) Number 8 issued to Frank M. Boileau for 534 shares of preferred stock in 1883. Same corporate signatures, style, etc but with green safety print. Vignette of 3 miners underground. Located at the north end of the Ajo Mts, the district lies in what is now the Papago Indian Reservation. The district was first prospected in the late 1860’s and early 1870’s, but the bulk of production came in the early 1880’s from this mine that yielded high-grade silver ore. Hamilton (1884, p. 235-6) reported the Gunsight was the primary mine in the district on which work had been done. At the time of his visit, a 380 ft shaft had been sunk to the water table on a large, but low-grade ore body. The district produced intermittently through 1965 yielding a total of about $176,000 from the metals produced. (ABM, Bull 189, p. 28-29). Est. $500-1000

Pima. Gunsight. Please also see the Myers District, which was combined with the Gunsight by some authors.

926. Pima. Gunsight. Pima Silver Company of Arizona. Incorporated in New Jersey in 1887. Issued to M. J. Dohan for 71 shares in 1887. Signed by President J. B. Baker and Secretary John W. Woodside. Datelined Camden, New Jersey. No Printer listed, no vignette. Uncancelled. Folds. White paper, black border and print. Cert. No. 5. 7 x 10. Pima’s president Becker was also president of the Gunsight Mining Co., which see. We have no information on the location of Pima’s mines, but it is presumed their activities were in or near the Gunsight district. Est. $200-500

927. Pima. Helvetia. Copper Deposits of Part of Helvetia Mining District, Pima County Arizona. By S. C. Creasey and George L. Quick. Geological Survey Bulletin 1027-F. 1955. Pages 301–323. This bulletin covers the general geology, ore deposits and mines of the Helvetia Mining district. There is a description and maps of mines typical of the district. The cover is gray heavy paper with black print. The bulletin pages are glossy white paper with black print. The cover has folds at the corners. There is a sticker pasted inside the cover from the Library of The Institution of Mining Engineers, London. There is a red stamp The Institution of Mining Engineers on the first page. There is a stamp on the second page from a library. Very good condition. Size 6 X 9”. Est. $25-75

928. Pima. Helvetia. Golden Rule Copper Company. Inc. in AZ, 1900. #395 issued to Charles F.W. Rechenberg for 20 shares in 1901. Signed by , W.H. Lake, pres, and John B. Hibbard, sec. Orange border, seal, and safety print, vignette at top center of underground mining scene with miners, uncancelled, 8 x 10, Condition good, somewhat tattered, folds weak, scotch tape repairs on right fold, 3 inch tear upper right, chip from lower left, minor staple holes. Company reported in 1902 that it held mining claims in the Helvetia district, with chalcopyrite ores assaying 12% copper, $5 gold (0.25 ounces per ton) and 200 oz/ton silver in an orebody 500 feet wide by 1,000 feet long. They further reported potential production of 600,000 lbs copper for 1902. As it turned out this was a fradulent mining company by one Wm. E. Lake, a prominent church and Sunday school worker of Yonkers, N.Y. who purchased sundry holes in the ground in Arizona at a cost of $500, then organized a million-dollar company thereon, keeping for himself all but the 7 shares required for dummy directors. He then pledged the company to pay him $15,000, and generously donated 200,000 shares to the treasury. Purchasers thought they were obtaining treasury stock and Christian friends invested $125,000, of which only $15,000 has ever been accounted for. Assets of the company at the time of the show-down, were a donkey hoist in Arizona and a roll-up desk in New York, the company had lost the hole in the ground on which it was originally incorporated. Moral: Any man - no matter who or where - selling mining stock on the strength of his church standing or alleged piety may be safely set down as a swindler”. [Ref: 1902CH, p.317, 1904CH, p.395]. Est. $25-75

929. Pima. Helvetia. Helvetia Copper Company. Inc. in AZ, 1905. 2 certificates: First; #A2168 issued to Samuel R. Kaufman for 100 shares in 1910. Signed by C.C. Prindle, pres, and Chas. W. Sexton, sec. Reddish-brown border, vignette of two underground miners with stope drill, uncancelled, 8 x 11, VF condition with folds, minor staple holes. Second; Certificate no. 2499 issued to Freeman H. Lathrop for 5 shares in 1910. Signed by C.C. Prindle, president, and Chas. W. Sexton, secretary. Green border, vignette of two underground miners with stope drill, uncancelled, 8 x 11, VF condition with folds, minor staple holes. Company held the Helvetia mine consisting of 55 claims, including 38 patented and a patented mill and smelter site in the Santa Rita mountains 30 miles southeast of Tucson, Arizona. There were five main copper-bearing ore deposits, the Isle Royale, Old Dick, Exchange, Pilot and Heavy Weight. The ore bodies occur as contact replacement deposits in Carboniferous limestone adjoining granitic porphyry. Main development was being made on three of the orebodies. The Copper World mine, opened in 1907, is the principal mine of the company, and consists of a vein, averaging 15 ft wide that could be traced 3,000 feet. Values were 5% copper, 0.5 ounces per ton silver, and 50 cents gold per ton (0.03 oz. per ton). The mine contains an ore shoot 500 ft. long and up to 40 ft wide that carried 2 to 8% copper, proved to a depth of 80 feet. The Copper World had a shaft 480 feet deep sunk at an angle of 64 degrees. The Isle Royale was developed by a 800 ft shaft, with a 196 ft. winze. Ore occurred as lenses averaging 3 to 5 feet, ranging up to 15 ft. and averaging 3% copper, with $1 per ton combined gold and silver values. The Old Dick mine contained an orebody 1,500 feet long by 20 - 50 feet wide, at shallow depths of 110 to 150 feet, with grades of 5% copper. In 1931, the company focussed on its oil subsidiary, Helvetia Oil Co. and it was reported the Helvetia mine became inactive in 1911 after a period of production. The company was reported inactive in 1949. [Ref: 1910CH, p.935, 1931CH, p. 332, 1949CH, p.471]. Est. $50-150

930. Pima. Helvetia. Iowa Mining & Leasing Company. Inc. in AZ.. No date. #50 issued to W.H. Miller for 50 shares in 1909. Signed by pres, illegible and G.W. Gilbert, sec. Black border, gold safety print, underprint of “common”, 3 vignettes, upper left and right of underground miners, top center of mountain, river landscape with mill and smelter, uncancelled, 6 x 10, Excellent condition with folds. Company may be same as Iowa Mining and Development Co. which held the Blue Jay and Good Friday mines in the in Helvetia district. There the mines consisted of tabular replacement deposits of argentite, silver-bearing galena, with cerargyrite and some free gold in the oxidized, near-surface material. The mine was worked sporadically from 1881 to 1939. [AzBull 189, p.72, 124] Est. $25-$50

931. Pima. Helvetia. Omega Copper Company. Inc. in AZ, 1906. #60 issued to Louis Zeckendorf for 5,000 shares in 1906 at Tucson, Arizona. Signed by Louis Zeckendorf, pres and Frank H. Hereford, sec. Gold border and seal, vignette of underground mining scene in upper left, uncancelled, 9 x 11, VF condition with folds, nicks at folds, and creases on left margin. Louis Zeckendorf, president and his brother Aaron formed the A. & L. Zeckendorf general merchandise business in 1854, in Santa Fe, NM, and in 1866 opened a store in Tucson. The business expanded and subsequently became the largest retail and wholesale merchandising business in Arizona. In 1883 Zeckendorf bought claims of the Omega Copper Company. Frank H. Hereford, secretary, was a mining lawyer and appointed district attorney of Pima county in 1884. The company held 2 claims and a smelter site 16 miles from Vail, in the Helvetia district, Pima county, and various claims in the Tyndall district, Santa Cruz county. The Helvetia property was one of the first copper mines in Pima county and had shipped “considerable” carbonate ore. The mine had a 150 ft upper tunnel and the 1,100 Tilly tunnel with about one mile of workings. The main vein was reported to average 40 ft wide with carbonate and sulfide ores averaging 6 to 9% copper with fair gold and silver values running up to 30% copper and 20 oz silver per ton. Mining was suspended in October, 1907, after shipping a little ore. Company reported dead in 1929.[Ref: 1908CH, p. 1078, 1912CH, p.1395] Est. $25-75

932. Pima. Mildred Peak. Jupiter Mining & Development Co. Cert. #408. Incorporated in Arizona in 1917. Issued to Ernest F. Miller for 30 shares in 1920. Signed by president C. John Hagenbucher and secretary Chas. Stanley. Uncancelled. Probably located in Pima, as we were able to find the mine in Mine Index…, Welty et al, 1985, p.57). Vignette of men working in underground mining scene, flanked by two vignettes of miners examining ore. Black border, gilt seal. Printed by Goes. 5” x 10”. Vf, minor tears at edges. Est. $25-75

933. Pima. Mineral Hill. Copper Emperor Mining Company. Incorporated in New York in 1882. Certificate number 80 issued to Geo. J. Weuck for 100 shares in 1883. Signed by President Albert Weber and Secretary J. L. Douglass. Printed by Henry Seibert & Bro., N.Y. Vignette of 4 miners working underground. Uncancelled. Folds. Datelined New York. Black border and print with gold corporate seal and underprint on white paper. 8 x 11. We are unsure of the location of this company’s property. Tenney (1929, p. 263), reporting on Pima County, mentions that the Emperor Copper Company was reorganized to exploit the copper deposits of Mineral Hill in 1882 after completion of the railroad. The company had begun development of the deposits and planned to erect a smelter, but when the price of copper slumped in 1884, they abandoned all work on the property. Whether this is the same as the Copper Emperor is not clear. The difference in names could be as simple as Tenny mis-transcribing the name properly, which he did several times. Est. $150-300

934. Pima. Montezuma. Montana & Arizona Consolidated Copper Mining Co. Incorporated in West Virginia in 1898. Certificate no. 502 issued to Elmer J. Balcom for 50 shares in 1899 at Boston, Mass. Signed by John w. Candler, president and J.R. Hodder, secretary. Green border, shaded company title, uncancelled, 8 x 13, VF condition with folds and creases. Printed by John A. Lowell & Co. Boston. Company reported to be dead in 1902. [Ref: 1902 CH, p.325] District from Garbani 2001. Est. $25-50

935. Pima. Myers. Ajax Silver Mining Company. Incorporated in New Jersey in 1882. Certificate number 27 issued to Wm. H. M. Marsh for 2000 shares in 1882. Signed by President H. W. Littlefield and Secretary S. Dunlap. Printed by Edward Stearn & Co., Phila. Vignette of 6 underground miners working around large pillar. Uncancelled. Folds with tears at edges, minor holes at fold intersections. “Location: Myers District, Pima Co., Arizona” Datelined Camden, New Jersey. Black border and print on white paper. 9 x 12. Located at the north end of the Ajo Mts, the district, also known as the Gunsight district, lies in what is now the Papago Indian Reservation. The district was first prospected in the late 1860’s and early 1870’s, but the bulk of production came in the early 1880’s from the Gunsight mine that yielded high-grade silver ore. Hamilton (1884, p. 235-6) reported the Gunsight was the primary mine in the district on which work had been done. At the time of his visit, a 380 ft shaft had been sunk to the water table on a large, but low-grade ore body. The district produced intermittently through 1965 yielding a total of about $176,000 from the metals produced. (ABM, Bull 189, p. 28-29). Est. $250-500

936. Pima. Myers. Mineral Bed Consolidated Mining Company of Arizona. Incorporated in New Jersey in 1880. Certificate number 45 issued to B. F. Bivins, Trustee for 1000 shares in 1880. Signed by President Jacob J. Hitchler and Wm. J. Turner, Treasurer. No printer noted. Vignette of several miners working underground. Uncancelled. Folds. &#x20Myers District, Pima Co., Arizona”. Datelined Philadelphia. Black border and print with red underprint on white paper. 8 x 12. Balch (1882, p. 1182) reports the company owned the Mineral Bed and Esperanza mines. The shaft on the principal mine is 100 feet, and additional 100 feet was under contract. Est. $200-300

Pima. Myers. Please see also the Gunsight District, which some authors include with the Myers.

937. Pima. Old Baldy. Old Hickory Copper Company. Thirty-two page prospectus provided to stockholders. Incorporated in Arizona in Includes usual discussion of property as well as four photographs of the shaft, scenery and prospects. The company owned 41 claims near Helvetia on the Jackson vein developed by 3000’ of tunnels, shafts and open cuts. Weed in 1925 (p. 412), having cited from the company prospectus, states, “While the mine is still a prospect awaiting development to prove its value, the management seems to be sincere in its beliefs and aspirations for making a mine”. Also included is a blank subscription and receipt for purchase of the company’s stock. Est. $25-50

938. Pima. Old Baldy. Old Hickory Gold Mining Co. Incorporated in Territory of Arizona 1897, issued 1897 to J. R. Wood for 45 shares, signed by E. GH. Denslow as president and Fleetwood Ward as secretary. Printed by Tucker, new York. Brown border with green safety pattern. Vignette of US Capital building at top center. 9 x 11”, uncancelled. Folds, some soiling. There is an old Hickory in the Old Baldy district of Pima Co. as listed by Kieth in Arizona Bureau of Mines Bull 189. They owned the Jackson mine, a copper and gold mine, according to Schrader (Mineral Deposits of the Santa Rita and Patagonia Mtns.), doing their work in 1910. It is unknown if this company was the predecessor. Very fine. Est. $50-150

939. Pima. Old Hat. Daily Arizona Consolidated Copper Company. Report to stockholders dated 1919. Prepared by W. H. Daly, General Manager. This company operated in the Old Had district, now part of the Oracle district in the Catalina Mountains north of Tucson. This area is in steep terrain making access and operations difficult. Phelps Dodge Copper Co. did some development work in the district around 1910, but there was no production prior to 1937. Some mining was done on the Daily claim group that year, but it is unknown if this company was still in control of the property at that time. Total production from the district thrugh 1974 amounted to only a little over 3,000 tons of copper, 94 tons lead, 25 tons zinc 118,000 ounces silver and 287 ounces of gold. (Keith, 1974, p 33-35) It seems unlikely that this company survived much beyond the early 1920’s based in this district-wide production record. 14 x 17. Very fine. Est. $25-75

940. Pima. Old Hat. Stratton Copper Company. Incorporated in Arizona in 1915. Certificate no. 262 issued to Silvester E. Adkins for 500 shares in 1915. Signed by Chas N. Wilson, president and W.H. Kershner, secretary-treasurer. Gold border with gold safety print and seal, uncancelled, 9 x 12, VF condition with folds, slight tears at folds. Company held 12 claims and 3 mill sites in the Catalina mountains which contained prospects of copper-silver ores in a contact deposit in limestone. Assays of 7% copper and 10 ounces silver per ton were reported, with 1,000 tons of ore blocked out. By 1917 the property had been developed by 10 shallow test shafts and 2 incline shafts, one to 200 feet deep in ore assaying 4 to 20% copper. The mine employed 40 men. The mine had an 800 ft. ore tram, and a 3/4 mile cable tram for wood and supplies. Ore shipments began in 1917, but property was still in development stage. The company was succeeded by the Stratton Consolidated Copper Company in 1919, and had hoped to be in production in 1921, then 1923, but became idle in 1926, and finally the company was reported to be closed in 1946. [Ref: 1916CH, p.1069, 1918CH, p.550, 1920CH, p.299] Est. $25-50

941. Pima. Old Hat. Stratton Copper Company Newspaper Clipping. Clipping is from the Arizona Daily Star, dated Wednesday Morning, January 3, 1917. The clipping describes the mining operation including geology, ore deposits and the claims. It is an add to buy stock. Printed on brown paper with black print. Irregular cut on the right side. The clipping is professionally mounted on foam core board. Newspaper size 17 X 22 1/2”. Overall size 20 3/4 X 26 1/4”. Est. $25-50

942. Pima. Oro Blanco. Arizona Southern Mining & Milling Co., incorporated in New Jersey in 1881, issued 1883 to Stenny G. Freeman for 1000 shares, signed by James N. Kerns as president and Geo. B. Dresher as asst. secretary. Large vignette of the New Jersey state seal at center under masthead. Uncancelled. Printed by Wm. Murphy’s sons, Philadelphia. 9 x 11”. &#x20Location: Oro Blanco, Pima County, Arizona Territory.” H. S. Searle was the superintendant, and was well thought of at the time. The company owned five mines at Oro Blanco; the Searle, Pilot, Herman, Arizona Southern, and Silver Wing comprised of 96 acres in total. They reported $75 ounce per ton silver ore and were expected to mill their own ore. Somehow, the expected mining and milling of ores did not take place. Other than Balch, there is no mention of the company in write-ups of Oro Blanco. [ref: Balch] Est. $200-500

943. Pima. Oro Blanco. Montana G&SMC. Incorporated in New Jersey in 1881. Issued to A. Feldspanche for 25 shares signed 1881. Signed by L. W. Klohr as president and T. Henry Ashbury as treasurer. Printed by Murphy’s sons, Philadelphia. “Oro Blanco Mining District, Pima County, Arizona.” Datelined Camden, NJ. Red underprint, black print, two mining vignettes. 10.5 x 12” As noted by the papers associated with this stock, the Montana Company was controlled by the Orion SMC. It was only a prospect. A seemingly large number of Camden New Jersey mining companies arose for Arizona properties. We do not see this anomaly for Nevada or Colorado companies. For the most part, it appears that the New Jersey enterprises were companies who sold stock on prospects to unknowing customers. Est. $200-400

944. Pima. Oro Blanco. Orion SMC of Arizona, incorporated in Pennsylvania in 1878, issued in 1881. Receipt for payment for stock in the Montana G&SMC to Hannah Harper for 250 shares, signed by Hamilton Lisston as president and B. F. Hart as secretary. No vignette. Black print with fancy masthead. Uncancelled. 7 x 10” folds with minor tears at fold ends. Please see above for story. Est. $150-300

945. Pima. Oro Blanco. Orion SMC, incorporated in Pennsylvania in 1878, issued in 1881 to Wm. S. Hays for 25 shares, signed by Hamilton Lisston as president and B. F. Hart as secretary (See write-up on Hamilton Disston under the North Sulphuret Mining Company in the Tombstone district of Cochise County). Mining vignette covers entire left inch of certificate. Black print with fancy masthead. Printed by Lehman & Bolton, Philadelphia. Uncancelled. 5.5 x 10” “Location Pima County, Arizona TY.” This property is west of Patagonia and 7 miles southeast of Arivaca. The company had decent ores for which they built a mill, which ran intermittently because of the lack of water, according to Burchard in 1881. There was another Orion mine in a neighboring district (Arivaca) which was probably also owned by the Orion company. Scarce. Est. $200-400

946. Pima. Oro Blanco. Orion SMC of Arizona, incorporated in Pennsylvania in 1878, issued in 1882. Receipt for payment for stock to C. B. Keen for 100 shares for $250, signed by Hamilton Lisston as president and B. F. Hart as secretary. No vignette. Black print with fancy masthead. Uncancelled. 7 x 10” folds with minor tears at fold ends. Please see above for story. Est. $150-300

947. Pima. Papago. Lincoln Consolidated Mining Company. 1910. $100 six year six percent first mortgage bond. Signed by President C. A. Wightman and Secretary George E. Ferrald. Printed by Goes. No vignette. Folds. Eight of ten coupons still attached. Black print with orange border on white paper. 9.5 x 15”. This company had property at Garcia, with ore in a replacement type ore deposit. Had production, but unknown specifics. Weed, v11, p530. Est. $75-150

948. Pima. Papago. Papago Placer Mining Co., Incorporated in Arizona in 1913. Certificate no. 238 issued to H.L. Nowell for 100 shares in 1919. Signed by H.L. Howell, president, and J.E. Cattrell, sectretary. Black border, gold seal, gold safety print, three vignettes, upper left and right of placer miners, center top of two large sluice boxes below dam, uncancelled, 8 x 11, Fine condition with folds, tears at folds, up to 2 inches. Company probably organized to operate in the Papago placer district along Ash Creek, about 30 miles southwest of Tucson. [Ref: AzMines Bull 168, p.89] Est. $25-50

949. Pima. Patagonia. Patagonia Silver Mining Company. Incorporated in New York in 1880. Certificate number 87 issued to W. A. Hamlin, Trustee for 100 shares in 1880. Signed by President H. H. Hamlin (?), Jr. and W. A. Hamlin, Secretary. Printer ABN, NY. Vignette top right corner of a dog’s head and bottom center of four miners working at an outcrop. Uncancelled. Datelined New York. 7 x 11. We could find no specific reference to this company. Possibly it purchased or restaked the old Mowry mine in the Patagonia Mts that originally was called the Patagonia Mine. It had been relocated in 1872 by “claim jumpers” after 1872 when things quieted a bit with the Apaches, according to Tenney, but if it was available for relocation, they were not “jumping” the claim, merely restaking an abandoned claim. This certificate is probably from the famous Patagonia mine from the relatively inactive period. Est. $400-800



Pima. Patagonia. Please see Arivaca, Cerro Colorado and Lot 156 & 157.

950. Pima. Patagonia. Santa Cruz Mines and Smelter Company. Inc. in AZ, 1906. $1000 special contract seven percent bond number A1290. Signed by VP Ralph H. Beaton and Sec Charles E. Prior. Printer not noted. Vignette of miner leaning on pick over “Ditat Deus”, Arizona’s State Motto. Folds. Green border and underprint, black print on white paper. Consists of two pages with 1-1/2 pages of coupons, all 15 still attached. This company was a reorganization of the Mowry Mines Company and the Alto Mines Company. The Mowry operated the Mowry mine, one of the first mines rediscovered in the district. It had been exploited by Mexicans before Americans became involved with it in 1858. A group of U.S. military men either purchased it from Mexican owners or relocated it and began development work. They were unsuccessful and after changing hands several time, it became the property of Sylvester Mowry in the spring of 1860. Mowry brought in an experienced mining engineer, F. Biertu who recommended a new plant which was installed. The mine did well until the outbreak of the Civil War. In 1862, General Carlton, a California Union officer arrived and accused Mowry of sympathizing with the Confederates and confiscated the mine. Mowry was imprisoned and while under Carlton’s control, the mine was poorly run, the ore was expended, supplies were stolen and the works were worn out. After the California troops withdrew in 1864, the mine was returned to Mowry, but he was unable to raise the capital necessary to make it operational again. Between 1864 and 1906, the mine was reopened by several interests. In 1904 the Mowry Mines Company took over and did extensive development work before being merged with Alto to form the Santa Cruz Mines Co. The Alto mine had a similar history, having been worked by the Jesuits and Franciscans in the 18th and early 19th centuries prior to being relocated in 1873 by Mark Lully. In 1902 it was purchased by the Alto Consolidated Mines, Smelting and Transportation Co. who operated it until their consolidation under Santa Cruz (Tenney, pp. 292 & 316) Very fine. Est. $50-150

951. Pima. Patagonia. Santa Cruz Silver Mining Co. Inc. in NY, 1880. #92 issued to W. A. Hamlin, Trustee for 25 shares in 1880. Signed by Pres H. H. Hamlin (?), Jr. and Sec Walker A. Hamlin. Printed by ABN, NY. Vignette bottom center of a dog’s head and at top left or four miners working at an outcrop. Uncancelled. Datelined New York. 7 x 11. This company most likely had properties in the Patagonia Mountains (see Patagonia Silver MC with same corporate officers). We were unable to locate any specific reference to the company. Est. $200-500

Pima. Patagonia. Please see Arivaca for more information on the early mines of the region.

952. No Lot.

953. Pima. Pima. Arizona Butte MC, Lot of 2, one is unissued. inc. in OH, 1882, issued 1885 to G. W. Doerzbach for 100 shares, signed by B. T. Lee, pres and P. G. Wacker, sec. Black-blue border and print, mining scene at right (version of the Nevada state seal), datelined Sandusky, Ohio, printed by Snyder & Black, NY. Uncancelled. 4.5 x 9” “Location of mine: Mohave County, Arizona Territory.” Lot includes an unissued certificate. The only reference we could find for Arizona Butte is in the Pima district in the middle of Pima County. The Mohave County reference is a mystery. Mohave and Pima were among the four original counties laid out in 1864, and it seems unlikely that a mistake could be made in location, but it is possible. The Arizona Butte mine in Pima later became known as the Minnie mine, near San Xavier and Twin Buttes. [ref: Keith] Est. $200-400

954. Pima. Pima. Arizona Prosperity Gold Mines Co. Inc. in Terr. of AZ. Issued to A. J. Lutz for 250 shares, #292, in 1902. Signed by S. P. Smith pres and W. C. Toustin sec. Vignette of miners working underground. Orange border, seal and underprint. Uncancelled. Printer - Goes. 8 x 11. There is a Prosperity mine group located within the Pima district, Pima County. (Index to Mining Properties, 1974, ABG). One 10 cent and one 5 cent documentary stamp affixed at lower left corner. Very fine. Est. $25-75

955. Pima. Pima. Paymaster Consolidated Mines Co certificate and letterhead, Incorporated in Arizona in 1906. Certificate no. 787 issued to Guy M. Spear for 20,000 shares in 1907. Signed by John P. Owen, president, and R.T.W. Langworthy, secretary. Reddish brown border, gold seal, three vignettes upper left of underground miners drilling, upper right of undergound mining with mule-drawn ore cart, vignette upper center of mountain scene with mills, vignette on back of underground miners, uncancelled, 9 x 12, Fine condition with folds and creases, small nicks at folds, staple holes at lower edge. Company held the Paymaster mine in the Sierrita mountains, which had opened in 1887 and produced $500,000 worth of ore under previous owners. The property had shafts to 325 ft deep with 4,000 ft. of workings on a vein averaging 15 to 20 ft wide, with silver-bearing lead and copper ores, reported to average 6% copper, 40% lead, and 65 ounces silver per ton, with reserves of 100,000 tons. Company reported to be succeeded in 1909 by Victoria Dev. Co. Tucson, Arizona. [Ref: 1908CH, p.1106, 1912CH, p.1397] Letterhead dated April 11, 1907, Tucson, Arizona to Mr. William McDermott, General Manager, Twin Buttes Mining & Smelting Co, Twin Buttes, Arizona and from J.E. Owen, superintendent to set up a meeting upon Owen’s return from the El Paso smelter. Letter with folds, slight nicks at fold. Est. $25-75

956. Pima. Pima. South San Xavier Copper Company. Incorporated in Arizona in 1906. Certificate no. 124 issued to J.F. Shields for 200 shares in 1907. Signed by H.E. Heighton, president and S. M. Franklin, secretary. Black border with vignettes of underground miner at corners and side centers, gold safety print and seal, vignette of underground mining scene upper left, uncancelled, 8 x 11, VF condition with folds. Company held contact copper deposit between limestone and porphyry, 30 ft. wide with a 30 inch paystreak of sulfide ore assaying up to 28% copper and 12 ounces silver per ton. Property developed by a 200 ft shaft. Smelter shipments were reported to be 13.5 to 20% copper, with some silver values. [Ref: 1908CH, p. 1257]. Selim M. Franklin was the 1st Chancellor of the University of Arizona. Est. $50-100

957. Pima. Pima. Victor Consolidated Mining Co., Incorporated in Arizona in 1928. Certificate no. 67 issued to Thos. W. Daily for 1,000 shares in 1929. Signed by R.J. Monahan, president, and E.J. Buckley, secretary. Orange border and seal, vignette of bald eagle top center, uncancelled, 8 x 11, Fine condition with folds and 1inch tears at several of the folds, one set of staple holes upper left. Company reopened a mine in the Manganese Hill area developed by a 125 ft-deep shaft. Company inactive in 1946. [Ref: 1931CH, p. 462, 1946CH]. Est. $25-50

958. Pima. Quijotoa. Arizona Peerless Silver Mining Co., incorporated in Kansas in 1882, issued 1882 to Henry Hamilton for 50 shares, signed by B. F. Simpson as president and C. H. Ward as secretary. Three vignettes: mining scenes at left and right, liberty in center. Crème paper, black border and print, gold and green underprint. RN facsimile in gold with “Shares $10 each.” Printed by Shober & Carqueville, Chicago. 8 x 11”. Uncancelled. Stains along folds. This company was clearly trying to ride on the coat tails of the Peerless mine at Quijotoa. A letter that accompanies this certificate states that Mr. Ward (secretary) had received $100, which was to be applied to the Arizona Peerless and Keystone mining companies for obtaining patents and developing the mines. The company was worthless, and probably never produced a ton. They are not listed in any of the standard references. Est. $200-400

959. Pima. Quijotoa. Bondurant Mining and Development Corporation. Incorporated in Arizona. No date. Certificate no. 29 issued to James Robson for 37,666 shares in 1902. Signed by W.J. Hegel, president and secretary, name illegible. Black border, gold safety print, three vignettes underground mining scenes upper left and right, mountain scene with mills, smelter upper center, uncancelled, 6 x 10, Fine condition with folds and slight nicks fold on right. No references were found for this company. Garbani places this in the Quijotoa district. Est. $25-75

960. Pima. Quijotoa. Combination Mining Co., inc. in CA, 1883, issued 1884 to George Grant for 200 shares, signed by W. S. Lyle as president and George R. Wells as secretary as secretary. No Vignette. Fancy pyramid at left with # of shares, etc. black border and print, crème paper. Printed by Britton & Rey, SF. 4x9”. Uncancelled. Pin holes at left, folds. “Location Pima County, Arizona Territory.” The Combination was on the Peerless Lode. The key properties and companies on the Peerless, including the Combination, were all owned by the Comstock kings. James L. Flood was on the Board of each. Flood was the brother of James C. Flood, a partner with Mackay, Fair, and O’Brien, and the two formed a business in San Francisco to do nothing but invest in western mines. William S. Lyle did the same thing, and George Wells was an attorney. Grant worked for a San Francisco bank. Many of the key mines in Quijotoa were named after the famous Comstock mines. The Combination was south of the Chollar and west of the Crocker. The production is unknown. [ref: Hamilton, Burchard 1885; SF directory 1881; Ghosts of Adobe Walls] Lyle was a San Franciscan capitalist. Wells was a San Francisco lawyer. [1879 SF dir.] Est. $200-500

961. Pima. Quijotoa. Crocker MC, incorporated in California in 1884, issued 1890 to Messer, trustee for 100 shares, signed by W. S. Lyle as president and Nat. T. Messer as secretary. “Location Pima Co., Arizona.” Eagle vignette at left4 x 9”, black on crème. Folds, discoloration throughout certificate from oily substance. Printed by Bosqui, SF. The Crocker was one of the important claims staked at Quijotoa. It was staked along with the Peerless and Peer. It was discovered in 1883 by four prospectors. “There’s a bigger thing than the Comstock on top of that mountain” said one of the prospectors, according to Hamilton in 1884 (Resources of Arizona). They shipped 5 tons to the Benson smelter netting $2500. W. S. Lyle looked at the mines that October and reportedly agreed to buy or lease/option them for $450,000, a sum far too high for unproven ground. Lyle was representing Mackay Flood of Comstock fame. Much work was done over the ensuing two years and significant ore reported mined, though no production statistics are available. The five key mines and mining companies were the Crocker, Peerless, Welden, Peer, and Combination. The fact that this certificate is dated 1890 shows activity through that point. By 1891, four of the companies had consolidated into the Peer, Peerless & Crocker Mining Company, with Lyle at the helm. Poole (Mining Directory, Poole Bros., 1891) described the property as that of the three plus the Welden with a steam hoist and 20 stamp mill with D. C. Pickett as superintendent. The company stayed the same through at least 1898, as the same data was reported by Poole (1898) then as well. Est. $150-300

962. Pima. Quijotoa. Locomotive Mining Co., incorporated in California in 1886, issued 1888 to Rehfisch & Co. for 100 shares, signed by H. B. Havens as president and A. H. Fish as secretary. Vignette of a locomotive in the center of the masthead. White paper, black border and print. Printed by Britton & Rey, SF. 4x9”. Uncancelled. Small piece torn from lower left corner, cutting into the margin. “Quijotoa Mining District, Pima County, Arizona Terry” Howard Havens worked for Donohoe, Kelley bankers in San Francisco. Fish was probably Charles Fish’s brother. The Locomotive was located on the Peerless vein and owned by Comstock interests. On Jan. 22, 1887, the Engineering & Mining Journal had this to say about the Locomotive: “The mines in this district (Quijotoa) among which are the Peer, Peerless, Crocker and other companies, are not destined to sleep in enforced inactivity much longer, says the Tucson Citizen. The result of the work by the Locomotive MC will again draw public attention to that section, about the richness of which so much was published several years ago.” Please see the Peerless story for more on these mines. [ref: Hamilton] Est. $200-500

963. Pima. Quijotoa. Peerless Mining Co., incorporated in California in 1883, issued 1886 to S. B. Wakefield for 100 shares, signed by Chas. H. Fish as president and A. Watterman as secretary. Eagle sitting on globe vignette at left. Yellow paper, black border and print. Printed by Britton & Rey, SF. 4x9”. Uncancelled. Ink spots at top. “Pima County, Arizona Territory” This was one of the most important mines in the Quijotoa district. Most of the best mines were owned by the important Comstock financiers Mackay, Fair, Flood, and O’Brien, who thought the district would become the next Comstock. Chas. H. Fish was also the president of the famous Con-Virginia mine at Virginia City, and was one of the most trusted men in the mining business. The Peerless did produce some silver, and curiously, three large silver ingots from there were found by bottle diggers in California near the Selby Smelting & Refining site several years ago. There is at least one other variety. [ref: Hamilton] Est. $250-500

964. Pima. Quijotoa. Peerless Mining and Development Company. Incorporated in Iowa in 1896. Certificate No. 61 issued to J. Willsey for 500 shares in 1896 at Chicago, Ill. Signed by Geo. S. Dawley, president and W. H. Crabtree, secretary. Brown border with brown safety print and seal, vignette of underground stope mining scene upper center, and brown vignette of miners lower center, Fine condition with folds, nicks at folds, and creases, age discoloration. This may be the company that connects to the Peerless gold-silver mine, Quijotoa district, Pima county. The mine was reported to consist of a tunnel, shaft and 20-stamp mill. [Ref: Tenney, 1927, p. 304, Mining Directory, 1898, p.184] Est. $75-150

965. Pima. Quijotoa. Producer Mining & Smelting Company. Incorporated in Arizona. No date. Certificate no. 315 issued to T.T. Watson for 21 shares in 1903 at Chicago, Illinois. Signed by J.W. McCoy, president and E. R. Zimmerman, secretary. Green border and partial green safety print, vignette of lady liberty and eagle at left center, uncancelled, 8 x 10, VF condition with folds, one inch tear at lower right fold, with three inch brown stain. The company held properties in Pinal county named the Jack Rabbit claim group, and properties in Pima county consisting of the Producer, Century-Chief, and Index group of claims. Property in the Quijotoa mountains, Pima county was acquired by $30,000 bond and lease of which $14,000 was paid before finding the vendors lacked proper title. Property had a main shaft 200 ft. deep with about 1/2 mile of underground workings that were reported to have 52,000 tons of gold- and silver-bearing copper ore. The property had a 50 ton per day smelter. In 1910, the company was reported dead, with the properties reverting to Frank Brownwell, former owner. See: Brownwell-Arizona Mining & Smelting Co. [Ref: 1904CH, p.595. 1905CH, p.666, 1910CH, p.1432] Est. $25-75


966. Pima. Quijotoa. Weldon Mining Co., incorporated in California in 1883, issued 1890 to E. E. Shotwell for 50 shares, signed by W. S. Lyle as president and A. Watterman as secretary. Mining vignette at left. Pink paper, black border and print. Printed by Britton & Rey, SF. 4x9”. Uncancelled. Small piece gone from upper right corner cutting into the border. Folds. “Location: Pima County, Territory of Arizona”. The Weldon was on the Peerless vein and owned by Comstock interests. There was also a crossover in company officers with several of the Quijotoa companies. It was active at least through 1906. [MinRes 1905,1907] Please see the explanation for the Peerless Company for more info. Est. $200-400

967. Pima. Rincon Mountain. Loma Verde Copper Co. Incorporated in Arizona in 1901. Certificate no. 548 issued to John Quincy Adams for 400 shares in 1901 at Los Angeles, California. Signed by T.C. Paxton, president, and E. Frank Campbell, secretary. Orange-brown border and safety print, vignette of underground mining scene upper center, uncancelled, 8 x 10, VF condition with folds, two tax revenue stamps affixed upper right corner. Company held claims 16 miles east of Tucson, near Agua Caliente springs with reported assays up to 23% copper and $5 gold per ton (0.25 ounces gold per ton). The property was developed by a main shaft 300 ft deep, 3 shallow shafts and 3 short tunnels. &#x20The company paid a dividend in 1903, apparently as a guise to sell more stock because the mine was closed soon after the dividend was paid. Company reported dead in 1908, after being a stock-jobbing swindle.” [Ref: 1905 CH, p.521, 1908CH, p. 886] Est. $25-75

968. Pima. Rincon. Virginia Belle Gold and Copper Mining Company. Incorporated in Arizona. No date. Certificate no. 216 issued to J.F. Jones for 1,000 shares in 1902 at Minneapolis, Minnesota. Signed by C. F. Potter, Jr., secretary, and W.W. Huntington, no title. Black border with gold safety print and seal, vignette of bald eagle in upper left, uncancelled, 8 x 10, VF condition, with folds. Company held property in Rincon district with two veins at limestone - granite porphyry contact. Property developed by 4 shafts ranging to 260ft deep, and with ores assaying 5% to 30% copper and $5 to $25 gold per ton (0.25 to 1.25 oz gold). [Ref: 1905CH, p. 811] Est. $25-75

969. Pima. San Pedro. San Pedro Oil Corporation. Stock certificate, checks, and papers written to and from William E. Jefferson. The company was incorporated in Arizona in 1930. Certificate number 87 issued to William E. Jefferson for 400 shares in 1931. Signed by secretary Edwin J. Tout. No printer. Vignette in the top center is of an oil field with some buildings with a train and hills in the back ground. There are two vignettes one on each side showing spouting oil wells, one with a derrick and one without. Uncancelled. Folds and staple marks in the right side. Fancy orange border with orange safety print. Black printing on white paper. Size 8 1/2 X 11”. The checks are from W. E. Jefferson to the San Pedro Oil Corporation of Arizona and have tears. The letters are talking about the purchase of the shares of stock Jefferson wants to buy. There is no reference of this company or its principles in our reference material. Est. $25-50

970. Pima. San Xavier. Mineral Hill Consolidated Copper Company. Incorporated in Arizona in 1904. Certificate no. 88 issued to John Darr for 22 shares in 1912 at Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. Signed by T.A. Barnsdale, president, and Chas. A. Dunn, secretary. Brown border, uncancelled, 8 x 11, VF condition with folds. Company held 26 claims in the San Xavier district 18 miles south of Tucson, including the Azurite claims which reportedly produced $500,000 worth of ore. The properties are developed by 74 pits and open-cuts, 48 shafts, five of which are over 125 to 345 ft. deep, and a total of 6,000 ft of underground workings. The property was reported to have reserves of 45,000 tons of ore averaging 10.2% copper, and $3 per ton in combined gold and silver values. Property had an antiquated smelter. [Ref: 1906CH, p.687, 1912CH, p.591]. Est. $25-75

971. Pima. Santa Catalina. &#x201uffalo Bill” Souvenir Card c. 1910, original by Courier Co. Printed signature of Cody. 6 1/2” x 4 1/4”. Fine, damaged: large crack across center, soiled. Wild Bill was the president of at least two mining companies, Cody-Dyer Arizona M&MC and Cody-Dyer M&MC. He had a passion for the mining industry, a business at which he failed financially. Est. $25-75

972. Pima. Santa Catalina. Big Vein Copper Co. Incorporated in 1909. Certificate no. 89 issued to J.B. Moran & Co. for 100 shares in 1909. Signed by Wm. H. Sterling, president and S. G. Metteer, secretary. Orange border with inner border of orange safety print, vignette of underground stope with miners drilling a round, uncancelled, 8 x 11, XF minor folds and wrinkles. Company held the Alamo property, consisting of 12 claims in the Santa Catalina mountains 7 miles south of Tucson. The geology was described as a mineralized porphyry dike 300 to 800 ft wide, at the contact of limestone and schist. The property had shallow shafts and tunnels totaling 300 ft of workings with stringers of ore assaying 2 to 20% copper, with gold and silver values. A two-compartment shaft was started in in 1909 with plans to be sunk to 800 ft. A reviewer of the company’s prospectus in 1910 found the statement that the mine was in the greatest mineral belt in the world to be “an absolute and presumably intentional misstatement of fact. The reviewer further stated that “Some very clever operations in shady high finance were conducted in 1909, with the aid of this stock, which was “washed” as high as $11, on the New York curb” The reviewer concluded “In view of the monstrous lies told in palming off this stock on the public, and the shady transactions on the New York curb, the company must be considered a swindle”. The company was out or business in 1912. [Ref: 1910, p.416, 1912CH, p.114] Est. $25-75

973. Pima. Santa Rita. Santa Rita Copper Company. Incorporated in Arizona in 1929, Certificate no. 216 issued to Robert Simpson for 5 shares in 1930. Signed by H.L. Berkey, president, and K.E. Sine, secretary. Green border with vignettes of miner at left and right. Green seal, three vignettes at top, center is landscape of mountains with mill and smelter, left and right are underground mining scenes. Uncancelled, 9 x 12, VF condition with folds. The company controlled the Santa Rita district, including the Tip Top and Helvetia group of claims 7 miles from Sahuarita. The ores carry copper, gold, silver an molybdenum in veins, replacements, and contact metamorphic deposits in granite and limestone. The mines are developed by shafts, tunnels, and open pits cuts. Ore reserves (1931) were estimated at 1,000,000 tons of $12 ore in shaft mines and 75,000,000 tons in open pit mines. The property was being development in 1929, with plans to begin daily shipments of 4 tons molybdenum oxide. [Ref. 1931CH, p 410] Est. $25-50

974. Pima. Santo Domingo. Southern Arizona Mining and Milling Company. Incorporated in New York in 1880. Certificate number 45 issued to M. L. Earle, Trustee for 100 shares in 1881. Signed by President Wm. F. Turner and Secretary M. L. Earle. Printed by Hosford & Sons, N. Y. Vignette at center of 4 miners working underground. Uncancelled. Datelined New York. &#x20Santo Domingo Mining District, Pima County Arizona.” Black border and print on white paper. 5.5 x 10. William F. Turner was the Chief Justice of the Third Judicial District in Arizona from 1864 to 1870 (Wagoner, p. 504). Hill, in Mining Districts of the western United States, cites the district as “location unknown”. Hinton discusses the district briefly. Est. $150-300

975. Pima. Sheridan. Montizona Copper Company. Incorporated in Arizona in 1918. Book of corporate records - Directors minutes, minutes of annual meeting, M.W. Bacon, president and W.M. Montgomery, secretary, covering dates 1918 to 1929, bound in H & M Loose Leaf Typewriter Book, leather covers, pages stamped nos. 1 to 156, and 8 additional pages, 9 x 11, x 1 1/4 inch thick, VF condition with some splits at front cover binding, some foxing of page edges. Company held 69 mining claims in the Sheridan and Brownell districts, 33 miles south of Casa Grande. The company reported copper-gold-silver mineralization in up to 44 fissure veins in granodiorite cut by dikes of aplite, monzonite porphyry, trachyte and andesite . The fissures ranged from 1 to 10 ft. wide, and a composite sample of 200 samples from 12 veins assayed 6% copper, 2.5 ounces silver per ton and 60 cents gold per ton (0.03 ounces per ton), with 10.5% iron, 2.4% alumina, 63.77% silica, 1.2% lime, and 0.2% sulfur. The property was developed by tunnels and shafts to a depth of 1,300 ft on 5 veins. As of 1931 the property was still in the development stage after 10 years of intermittent operations. [Ref: 1931CH, p. 379] Est. $200-400

976. Pima. Sheridan. Montizona Copper Company. Incorporated in Arizona in 1918. Book : Petrographic Study, by R.J. Colony, Montizona Copper Company, dated 1925. This is report no. 448 that describes the petrography of a series of rock and ore specimens submitted by the Montizona Copper Company. Eight samples were described, 5 are unmineralized country rock, 2 were mineralized, and 1 is an ore specimen. The paper includes black & white photomicrographs of each specimen. Brown cover with pale red cord tie bind, 26 pages, 8 1/2 x 11, VF condition. See above lot for description of company and holdings. Est. $100-300

977. Pima. Sheridan. Montizona Copper Company. Incorporated in Arizona in 1918. Prospectus, 4 pages, dated 1928. Describes location title, geology, and development of the Montizona Copper Co. holdings, Sheridan mining district, Arizona. Detailed claim map on back page, cross section on page 2 with veins and selected workings hand colored in red. Excellent condition. See above lot for description of company and holdings. Est. $50-150

978. Pima. Sierrieta. Cowboy Mining & Smelting Co. Report. c1920. Consisted of 22 claims, reportedly worth further exploration and subsequent development. 4 page publication. Vf, folds. Est. $25-50

979. Pima. Silver Bell. Arizona Belmont Mining Company. Incorporated in Arizona in 1911. Certificate no. 2499 issued to Sinkler Bros. For 100 shares in 1913. Signed by Meyer Schamberg, president and John Rice, secretary. Brown border, brown safety print, vignettes of townsite upper center, miner walking at left side, and pack burro right side, uncancelled, 8 x 11, VF condition with folds and creases, minor staple holes upper left. Company held a copper property of 16 claims, developed with a 392 ft. shaft in the Silver Bell district northwest of Tucson. Operations were reported suspended in 1913. [Ref: 1912CH, p.68, 1918CH, p.531]. Est. $25-50

980. Pima. Silver Bell. El Tiro Copper Company. Incorporated in Arizona in 1907. Certificate no. 444 issued to Henry P. Ayer for 50 shares in 1908. Signed by E. B. Kurtz, vice president and C.E. Ellis, secretary. Brown border, elk vigenette upper center, uncancelled, 8 x 11, VF to excellent condition with folds, minor staple holes upper left. Company held 14 claims in Silver Bell district 70 miles northwest of Tucson. Property was a supergene enriched copper porphyry, with disseminated chalcocite, cuprite, melaconite, and chalcopyrite in altered granite porphyry and limestone to a depth of 50 to 150 ft. Two orebodies, totalling about 10 acres in area, and to a depth of 300 ft. were under development. Several shafts of 50 to 400 ft. depth, and 6,000 ft of workings developed 250,000 tons of ore. In 1907 ten carloads of mine-run ore returned 7.55 to 14.6% copper, averaging 9.92%. [Ref: 1908CH, p.656] Est. $25-75

981. Pima. Silver Bell. Imperial Copper Co. Incorporated in Territory of Arizona 1903. Issued to E. D. Russell for 10 shares, cert #566, in 1903. Signed by E. B. Gage president and A. W. Gage secretary. No vignette. Fancy masthead. Brown border. Uncancelled. Printer - Broun, Lent Co. 10 x 12. Owned 60 claims, including the Open Boot mine, aka the Mammoth, in the Silver Bell district of Pima County. There were two shafts with 1200 feet of workings in a geologic setting that was comparable to other highly productive copper fields in Arizona. In 1904, the company produced 3 million pounds of copper and 21,000 ounces of silver. The management of this company was the same as those operating the Tombstone Cons Co. (Copper Handbook, 1905, p.474-75). Wear and foxing along fold creases. Very fine. Est. $50-150

982. Pima. Silver Bell. Silver Valley MC Prospectus. Consisted of 7 claims over 140 acres, covering 4500’ in length of a contact replacement fissure. Offering shares for $1 a piece. Simple 4pp prospectus. Vf, folds, paper clip marks. The company was New York financed, with McClelland as the president, working out of the Silver Valley location at Silver Bell. They owned 7 claims with extensive prospecting on the property, which was equipped with a hoist and other mining machinery, six houses, a boarding house, and a company grocery store. Est. $50-150

983. Pima. Silver Bell. Young America Copper Mining Co. Incorporated in New York. Certificate number 96, issued to T. E. Tomlinson Jr. for 1000 shares in 1881. Signed by president Geo. H. Clark and secretary T. E. Tomlinson Jr. Printed by David H. Gildersleeve, NY. No vignette. Uncancelled. Folds. Black line border with black print. Size 6 X 8”. Hamilton (1884, p. 236) reports that the Young America Copper Co. has a twenty-ton smelter, which is kept steadily at work and has already produced a large quantity of bullion. Not to be confused with the Silver Belle Mine in Cochise County. Est. $200-400

Pima. Stratton. Please see Old Hat district, the original name for the district.

984. Pima. Tucson. Arizona Hydraulic Power Co., incorporated in Arizona in 1914, issued 1915 to James Elder for 36 shares, signed by E. H. Meek as president and E. J. Clark as secretary. Vignette of river in canyon. Orange seal, border, and underprint. 8 x 10”, Uncancelled, no printer shown. Exactly the same certificate as the Catalina Water & Power. Strip of Four five cent red documentary stamps attached at top center. Two file holes at left, 1.5 inch tear at center. E. H. Meek was also president of Verde Hot Springs. Est. $25-50

985. Pima. Tucson. Arizona Narrow Gauge Railroad, incorporated in Arizona Territory in 1883, issued 1883. $1000 first mortgage bearer bond. Bond No. 202. Black on white with green $1000 underprint. Several vignettes: at top center is a railroad flanked at left by miner and right by Indians. Small vignettes within the border, which is a 1” wide fancy engraved pattern. Tucson Citizen print. 32 coupons attached of 40 originally issued. Spectacularly ornate. 19.5 x 14.5” with dark green matting and aluminum frame, glass front, outside dimensions 24 x 19”. Signed by W. H. Culver as president and Z. L. Tidball as secretary. Coupons signed by George Pusch. Uncancelled (sold as an antique only.) This may have been the most or one of the most artistic pieces produced by the Tucson Citizen at this time. This railroad line is mired in history with bad data, unfounded judgments, and generally poor reporting. Its real history is one of complete political warfare causing temporary financial harm, with “guaranteed” bond payment not made until 65 years after the issue. According to a summary written by Peyton Reavis in 1989, at least three different authors of Arizona History considered the Arizona Narrow Gauge RR as a “swindle.” The directors of the company included nearly all of the well-known and successful Tucson businessmen. Since the addition of the Southern Pacific through Tucson, in 1880, Tucson failed to realize the growth that they thought the railroad would bring. In order to increase business, it was thought to run a line from Tucson to the Globe/Miami copper mines, which included Castle Dome and other very rich copper mines. They foresaw the future of these great mines that would become world-class after 1900 after the likes of Daniel Jackling and other fine tuned open pit mining. With the addition of a rail line in and out of Globe, Tucson assumed they would become the trading mecca. To facilitate the railroad, Tucson issued bonds to back the railroad bonds. Newspapers of the day were excited at the prospects. Great idea, but only half the big picture. They forgot to politic (or grease the wheels, as they say) with Gila County officials in Globe. Thus Gila objected to the rail, leading to infighting within the Pima (Tucson) bunch. The naysayers used the argument against narrow gauge, deciding the rail line capabilities too small. Irrespective, construction began in 1883, but only ten miles of track were lain before complete collapse of the company. Tucson didn’t turn over the matching money and withdrew support. Support out of Tucson went back and forth, until 1886, when $150,000 in county bonds were sold for the railroad. Meanwhile Gila County got help from Washington, preventing financing of private ventures. The Arizona Narrow Gauge reorganized in 1887 as the Tucson, Globe, and Northern RR, changing to standard gauge. The bad politics continued as County supervisors changed and opinions changed. Political maneuvering over the next 50 years did not get the rail built, but centered on bond payment of what had been sold. By 1950, $999,811.79 had been paid on $204,124 of original bonds sold. Certainly nearly everybody lost out in this fiasco. Progress was certainly slowed at Globe, though eventually a supply rail line was built. Investors made 5 times their money, but paid to the next generation. We assume this is the only Arizona Narrow Gauge Bond left in private hands. Attached to the frame on the back in a protective sleeve is a document signed by Handy, Reed, and Farley for the “ANGRR”, January 12, 1883. Est. $1500-3000

986. Pima. Tucson. Bail-Heineman Company. Stock certificate and illustrated letterhead. Incorporated in the Territory of Arizona in 1902. Issued to S. Heineman for 3.5 shares, certificate no. 8 at Tucson. Signed by Heineman as president and A. B. Craig as secretary. Uncancelled. Green eagle and green underprint. Eagle vignette in masthead. Folds. 8 x 10”. No printer. The letterhead is a pictorial letterhead printed in green with a picture of the brewery in the center flanked by ads and promotional material all around. It noted that they were wholesale liquor merchants, specializing in Green River whiskey “the whiskey without a headache.” The content of the letter involves business matters, dated 1908. The Company was also the wholesale distributor of Anheiser-Busch. In 1919, one of the partners was Art Still, the signor of the letter. At Bisbee, the Company had interest in the Central Bar and Belmont Bar. [ref: unpublished manuscript] Ex. Rare. Est. $50-150

987. Pima. Tucson. Calabasas, Tucson, and Northwestern Railroad Co. incorporated in Territory of Arizona, first mortgage 6% gold bond, $1000 in green underprint. Fancy green border, vignette of train in station and miners at bottom. 1886. Specimen proof. Four holes punched in signature area. Chip at lower left in margin. 80 coupons attached at right. 15 x 30”, folds. Printed by the Franklin Bank Note Co. This was a rail line that never got off the ground because the sale of bonds was never completed. The rail as proposed was supposed to connect Phoenix, Florence and Tucson. They anticipated branches to many of the mining communities, including Arivaca, Quijotoa and Globe. It may be the only remaining remnant of this uncompleted rail line.[ref: Poors] Est. $300-600

988. Pima. Tucson. Catalina Water & Power. Incorporated in Arizona 1911, issued in 1911 certificate No. 1 to Phillip Contzen for 2 shares, signed by A. H. Thompson as president and Phillip Contzen as secretary. Orange seal, border, and underprint. 8 x 10”, Uncancelled, no printer shown. “Canada del Oro Canyon”. Three worm holes about dead center across the certificate. Vignette of river in canyon. This is a founder’s share. Cantzen was born in Tucson in 1868 and educated in Germany. He was appointed US Land and Mineral; Surveyor in Arizona in 1893, just at the crucial time of the Peralta Grant hearings and trials with Reavis (see Casa Grande Improvement Co,) He later became a city engineer in Tucson and a city council member. The term Catalina refers to the Catalina Mountains, the prominent range behind (east) Tucson. Est. $25-75

989. Pima. Tucson. Catholic Church original photograph by Vick. 11 x 14” Printed approximately about 1940. On the back is “Catholic Church, Nov. 1896, Tucson, San Augustine, Vick (or Vicko). Minor dirt along some edges and some wear. VF. Est $25-75

990. Pima. Tucson. Cowboy art collection. Group of ten different cards, images, or printed pieces by renowned cowboy artist Pete Martinez, circa 1940-1965. Most are 3 x 5”. Martinez was a working cowboy from the Tucson area, born in 1894 in Porterville, California (cow country). He had a natural talent for art, exhibiting at New York and across America. An article on Martinez in a 1971 newspaper comes with the pieces. Est $25-75

991. Pima. Tucson. Gila Valley, Globe & Northern Railway Co. incorporated in New York (?), first mortgage 5% gold bond, $1000 in orange underprint. Fancy orange border, vignette of train at top and miner at bottom. 1894. Specimen proof. Four holes punched in signature area. Right edge trimmed to border, probably from condition problems. Chip at right edge with tears. Some damage along fold lines. Three other holes punched along left edge in orange border. No coupons attached. 15 x 100”, folds. Printed by the American Bank Note Co. This rail line was built from Bowie to Globe, connecting the Globe/Miami mines with the Southern Pacific Railroad at Bowie. It was a major endeavor completed in 1898, probably completely controlled by Southern Pacific. The gamble paid off, because the mines there became world class copper producers for a century. All of the railroad certificates in this collection were provided to author Terry Cox by Mr. Garbani for his work listing the American Railroad certificates. Ex. Rare. Est. $200-400

992. Pima. Tucson. Redington Live Stock Co. Capital Stock, $20,000. Incorporated in Arizona in 1885. Certificate number 92 issued to J. A. Crowley for 2000 shares (no date of issue). Signed by president D. Markham and Secretary H. B. Tenney. “Place of Business, Tucson, Arizona.” Printer Tuscon “Citizen” print. Vignette on the left is an oval of a deer standing by a lake and some trees. Under print in green of some cattle and sheep in the center. Uncancelled. Folds. Fancy black border with black print on vanilla paper. Size 6 X 9 1/2” The Reddington Livestock Co. was one of the subsidiaries of the Bayless & Berkalew Co. Who’s Who in Arizona (1913, p. 225-226) states that the Bayless & Berkalew Co. is one of the oldest live stock firms in Arizona, being organized by Charles H. Bayless and his father in around 1884. Charles was president of the company until 1885 when he pursued other interests, mostly educational, in Kansas. None of the principals or company name is listed in Sonnichsen’s Tucson. EX Rare. Est. $150-300

993. Pima. Tucson. San Ricardo Mining Co Letterhead. of Tucson, Arizona, March 19, 1884. Incorporated in 1883 in Arizona Territory. This company left little, if any, trace in the written historical record. They are not found in any of the mining references from 1883 to 1886, including Balch, Hamilton, Burchard, Tenney and others. This letterhead has a vignette of a miner at left. The masthead shows the company officers and directors. The office was located at 219 Meyer St. in Tucson. The mine location is not shown. The note is a declaratory statement by the company president Col. J. S. Morgan that he agrees to purchase 125 shares of stock. Morgan is not listed in Sonnichsen’s Tucson, nor in several other references available to us at the library. 6 x 8.5”. No printer shown. Folds. Est. $50-100

994. Pima. Tucson. San Ricardo Mining Co. Incorporated in 1883 in Arizona Territory. Capital stock issued to Eliz. Seelbach for 1000 shares, signed by B. F. Powers as president and Louis Hoffmann as secretary. Dated 1888. 7 x 11.5” Black border and print, red masthead and some underprint. No Vignette. No printer shown. Fancy embossed corporate seal with miner in the middle. Datelined Tucson. Uncancelled. No information on the company or individuals. Ex. Rare. Est. $150-300

995. Pima. Tucson. San Ricardo Mining Co. of Tucson, Arizona Territory. Incorporated in 1883 in Arizona Territory. Preferred stock issued to Mrs. Eliz. Schnauffer for 300 shares, signed by B. F. Pomes as president and Louis Hoffmann as secretary. “Signed at Cleveland, Ohio.” Dated 1886. 8 x 10”. No printer shown. Purple border and masthead, black print, no vignette. Uncancelled. We have no information on the Company or principals, who are not listed in Sonnichsen’s Tucson. Ex. Rare. Est. $150-300

996. Pima. Tucson. San Ricardo Mining Co. of Tucson, Arizona Territory. Incorporated in 1883 in Arizona Territory. Capital stock issued to Eliz. Seelbach for 100 shares, signed by B. F. Powers as president and Louis Hoffmann as secretary. Dated 1886. 6 x 10.5” Black border and print, red masthead and some underprint. Vignette of liberty at lower left. No printer shown. Fancy embossed corporate seal with miner in the middle. Uncancelled. Datelined Tucson. No information on the company or individuals. Ex. Rare. Est. $150-300

997. Pima. Tucson. Tucson Rapid Transit Company. Lot of two pieces. The first piece is a first mortgage sinking fund six per cent 22 year bond. Incorporated June 16, 1905, in the Territory of Arizona. Certificate number 264 unissued for $1,000 dated 1906. Not signed. Forty four coupons attached to the bond. Printer is the Denver Lith. Co. There is a vignette of an electric street car on rails in the upper middle of the bond. Uncancelled. No folds or tears. Very fine condition. Very wide, fancy blue border with very fancy corners. Black under print of “$1000”. Black print on white paper. Size 10 1/2 X 16”. The second piece is a pamphlet named “Cars Stop Here A Brief History of Street Railways in Tucson, Arizona” by John A. Haney and Cirino G. Scavone. Published Spring 1971, No. 23. This pamphlet describes the history of the Tucson Rapid Transit Company from its beginning as the Tucson Street Railway until 1967 when it was sold to the American Transit Corporation of St. Louis, Missouri. Sixty–four pages in length. Three ring binder holes are punched in the left side. There are some small tears around these holes and at the left corner. Color and black printing on white paper. Size 8 1/2 X 11”. Very nice condition. The Tucson Rapid Transit Co. was incorporated by George F Kitt, Mose Drachman, William W. Daily, Rosario Brena and Samuel L. Kingan. McClintock (1916, pp. 40, 812, 356) sites that Samuel L. Kingan was an successful attorney in Tucson, opening his law office in 1900. He was one of five members from Pima county who served on the constitutional convention which drew up the state constitution under which Arizona was admitted to the Union. Mose Drachman was involved in cattle, mining, agricultural, and in real estate. He was appointed to the territorial board of equalization. He was elected to the second state senate from Pima county, a two year term from 1915 the bond an d coupons. Size 15 X 19”. It was reported that C. Meyer Zulick was the president of this company. He was the seventh Governor of the Arizona Territory. Est. $100-300

998. Pima. Twin Buttes. Boston - Mexican Mines Company. Inc. in AZ, 1905. #612 issued to Charles G. Witte for 100 shares in 1906. Signed by S.E. Otis, president, and A. H. Vanderpool, secretary. Brown border and seal, vignette of underground mining scene top center, uncancelled, 9 x 11, VF condition with minor folds, minor staple holes upper left, punch of *100* in upper right border. Company has mines at Twin Buttes, Arizona and Hermosillo, Sonora, Mexico. Copper Beauty group of 10 claims in the Twin Buttes district had a shallow shaft and assays of 5 to 8.5% copper from surface assays. In Mexico, the El Sol, 9 miles from Llano (Estacion Llano, south of Santa Ana?) is reported to have veins 3 to 4 ft. wide with values in copper, gold, and silver. This mine would be in the region of the San Francisco open pit mine, mined from 1994 to 1999 for approximately 300,000 ounces gold. The Carmen and Adriana are copper, gold, silver properties in Sonora near Black Mountain. The Caliche gold mine is in the Magdalena mountains. The La Azurena mine is said to be 3 1/2 miles from Cerro Azul, Sonora, with shafts on a vein 5 to 25 feet wide with assays of 35 to 290 ounces silver per ton. [Ref: 1908CH, p. 400] Est. $25-75

999. Pima. Twin Buttes. Buttes Copper Company. Incorporated in Arizona 1938. Certificate no. 49 issued to Frederick L. Stahl for 100 shares in 1939. Signed by W.C. Langhlier, vice president, and secretary, name illegible. Brown border and safety print, eagle vignette, uncancelled, 8 x 11, VF condition with folds. This may be the same as the Buttes Mining Company which was formed in 1928 as a reorganization of the Midland Copper Company. The Buttes Mining Company reopened the Minnie Mine, and a small shipment of ore was made during the high copper market of 1929, after which the mine was closed and abandoned. The year of incorporation is the same as referenced by Tenney. It is possible that Tenney made a mistake and exchanged the word Copper for Mining. [1929 Tenney, p. 265] Est. $25-50

1000. Pima. Twin Buttes. Chesterfield Copper Company. Incorporated in Arizona in 1907. Certificate number 1615 issued to Mary A. Laird in 1909 for 1000 shares. Signed by President H. M. Brown and Treasurer C. E. Harvey. Printed by Goes. &#x20Incorporated under the laws of Arizona”. Vignette top center of sluices along river; at upper left of 3 miners inspecting rock sample; at top right of miner panning for gold streamside. Uncancelled. Folds. Black border and print with gold seal and safety print. 8.5 x 11. Also includes $50 first mortgage bond, signed by same officers. Printed by Wm. F. Murphy’s & Sons, Phila. Black print with orange border, safety and underprint on white paper. 8 of 10 coupons remaining. Mines included the Tiger and Crown King mines, 5 miles from Twin Buttes County (?) and produced silver-lead ore. Copper Handbook, 1910-11, p. 596) Est. $200-400

1001. Pima. Twin Buttes. Elkhorn Mining Company. Incorporated in Arizona in 1901. Certificate no. 52 issued to F.B. Haynes for 300 shares in 1905. Signed by Ezra Shelley, president and E.S. Forderer, secretary. Black border, gold safety print and seal, gold underprint “shares $1.00 each”, vignette of elk in upper left, uncancelled, 8 x 10, VF condition with folds. Company held a copper property consisting of 10 claims about 3 miles west of the Senator Morgan mine in the Twin Buttes district. The property was developed to a depth of 150 ft, with about 500 ft of workings with copper sulfides. Property and company reported idle in 1910. [Ref: 1910CH, p.770]. Est. $25-75

1002. Pima. Twin Buttes. Magnate Copper Company. Incorporated in Arizona in 1916. Certificate no. 320 issued to Samuel Jubelirer for 100 shares in 1917. Signed by Chas. Z. Jones, president and Maurice Brooke, treasurer. Green border, seal and safety print, eagle vignette at top center, uncancelled, 8 x 11, VF condition with folds, minor staple holes upper left, penciled note lower edge. Company held porphyry copper property in Twin Buttes district, hosted by monzonite. Mineralization occurred along NE and SW structures with quartz, pyrite, and chalcopyrite. Property was developed by four shafts ranging from 40 ft to 150 ft deep. Sampling of veins and stringers resulted in 1.5 to 2.5% copper, 1.5 oz silver per ton. Three drill holes contained assays from 1.77% to 2.2% copper. [Ref: 1920CH, p.290]. Est. $25-50

1003. Pima. Twin Buttes. Swastika Copper and Silver Mining Co., Incorporated in Arizona. No date. Certificate no. 22 issued to Mrs. Jm. B. Anderson for 125 shares in 1907. Signed by W. K. Royce, president, and J.S. Hopley, secretary. Gold embossed border, gold seal, vignettes at top left and right of miners underground scene, top center of mountain scene, uncancelled, 8 x 11, Extremely fine condition with folds. Holdings included the Swastika group of claims which carried silver-lead ores, and the Calendar group with silver-copper ores in contact metamorphic rocks at limestone-granite contacts. Property had 360 ft of workings. [Ref: CH1908 p.1294, CH1912, p.853] Est. $25-75

1004. Pima. Twin Buttes. Twin Buttes Mining & Smelting Company Articles of Incorporation, Printed Version and Original Handwritten Version, 1906. The original handwritten Articles of Incorporatio is 5 page document, legal size, folded, labeled “original”, (blue carbon type) founded and signed by John G. Baxter, John Ellis, and Michael Irish and notarized. Recorded with Pima county recorder by David S. Rose. The second item is the Revised Articles of Organization and By-laws booklet, Twin Buttes Mining and Smelting Co., dated 1906, 24 pages, 4 x 6. Both are in extremely fine condition. Est. $50-150

1005. Pima. Twin Buttes. Twin Buttes Mining & Smelting Company Documents. Lot of 4 pieces. The first is a blank voucher check on company to the Consolidated National Bank, Tucson, 7 x 8. Second is a blank check, Twin Buttes Mining & Smelting Co., unnumbered, Southern Arizona Bank & Trust Company, 3 x 8, printed by Union Litho Co, LA. Third is an ore shipping report, blank, 3 x 8. The last item is a blank voucher with company name at top, 8 x 8. All in excellent condition. Est. $50-150

1006. Pima. Twin Buttes. Twin Buttes Mining & Smelting Company Scrip. Lot of 2 pieces. The first item is #2432 good for $10.00 in merchandise with two $2.50 coupons and one $5.00 coupon. The second is #302 good for $5.00 in merchandise with two $2.50 coupons. Both are 3 x 5, unused and unsigned. The cover has Twin Buttes Mining & Smelting Co printed in black and the coupons are good at the company store. Both Extremely fine. Est. $50-150

1007. Pima. Twin Buttes. Twin Buttes Mining & Smelting Company. Incorporated in Arizona in 1903. Certificate Number 1, issued to John D. Baxter for 333,332 shares (1/3 of capital stock of 1,000,000 shares) in 1903 at Tucson, Arizona. Signed by David S. Rose, president, and H. J. Blakely, secretary. Black border with green safety print and seal, eagle vignette at top center, cancelled with ink signature across certificate, 8 x 11, Mostly excellent condition, minor folds, some aging discoloration right edge. John D. Baxter was mine superintendent for the copper mines located in the Helvetia district 28 miles south of Tucson. The company held 61 claims, some of which dated to 1880. Mines on the property included the Senator Morgan mine. The Copper Glance mine, and the Copper King mine. Overall, the underground workings were reported to total about one mile, with 50,000 tons of ore blocked out for mining and 10,000 tons on the dumps averaging 7% copper and 1.85 oz. per ton silver, with traces of gold. The Senator Morgan mine was developed by a 200 ft shaft with 550 of workings to mine a vein deposit averaging 25 ft wide by 300 ft long, to a depth of 95 ft. carrying sulfide copper values that averaged 10% copper. By 1931, the Senator Morgan had been developed to 900 ft. The Copper Glance was developed by a 415 ft shaft, and 450 ft of drifts. The shaft cut 30 ft of iron gossan and 200 ft of carbonate ore. The Copper King mine had a 250 ft shaft with 250 ft of drifts with sulfides at the lower levels. The company had a private rail line named the Twin Buttes Railroad, completed in 1906 from Tucson to Twin Buttes, a distance of 27 miles. Item 10. This is the best possible certificate from this major mine. [Ref: 1906CH, p.993, 1931CH, p.441]. Est. $250-500

1008. Pima. Twin Buttes. Twin Buttes Railroad Co. Lot of 2 items. The first is a time check with stub, 5 x 11, blank, with attached stub. The second is an original shipping receipt for the Twin Buttes Railroad Company, 5 x 9, blank, with 1.5 inch tear located at left center edge. Both very fine. Est. $25-50

Pima. Tyndall. Please see Santa Cruz County, Tyndall district. In 1899, Santa Cruz County was cut out of Pima County and the district went with it. Also, please see the Aztec district in Pima County, often included with Tyndall.

1009. Pima. Vail. Helena Gold Mines Company. Incorporated in Arizona in 1904. Certificate no. 754 issued to H.G. Roat in 1906 for 200 shares. Signed by A. R. Benzie, president, and W.H. Haven, secretary. Black border, gold safety print and seal, vignette of mythology, fighting lion in upper right, uncancelled, 8 x 11, Excellent condition, folds show creases. Company held gold property in Vail district which in 1907 was operated with 20 men and a 10-stamp mill. [Ref: 1907 Dunbar, p.59]. The name is probably a reflection of the owners of this company maybe being from Montana. Est. $25-75

1010. Pima. Yavapai. Baca Land Grant Corporation. Incorporated in 1901 in Arizona. $500 thirty-six year six percent gold bond. Signed by Vice-President (Illegible) and Treasurer Henry McFarnam. Printed by ABN, NY. Vignette top center of survey party, at bottom center of spread-winged eagle clutching arrows & shield. 56 of 60 coupons still attached. Black print with green border and underprint. 10 x 14.5. The Baca family of New Mexico was allowed to select land in Arizona in lieu of land granted to the town of Las Vegas, New Mexico. The family selected two tracts called “floats” in southern Arizona. Float No. 3 was located on the Tumacacori mining claim and previously established land grants. In 1866 the float was moved northeastward about 5 miles, however, it again covered mineral lands in the Santa Rita Mountains. Floats were not supposed to include mineral lands, so the issue went to the US Supreme Court and was settled in 1914. A second float was located on Francis Creek in Yavapai County and comprised 99,000 acres. (Walker & Bufkin, 1986, Historical Atlas of Arizona, p. 15). We assume this company was organized to manage the lands in these floats, however, we are unable to find more specific information relating to it. Est. $100-300

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